Carey Mulligan, Andy Serkis, Daniel Kaluuya, and Martin Freeman Join the cast of ‘A Christmas Carol’ Movie

By October 18, 2018 Adaptations, News

Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol is one of the moat beloved books of all time, and it’s not hard to see why. The book reminds us that the true meaning of Christmas is not about presents or delicious food, but rather, goodwill to your neighbours, even those as cantankerous as Scrooge. The novel has been adapted into countless forms of media, from films, TV shows, and even graphic novels, and now a new film adaptation is on the horizon.

As reported by Screen Daily, Saboteur Media gained worldwide rights for the project and is currently being pitched to buyers after the film wrapped in August. The story will take a new look at the classic story and begins with a Victorian family preparing a toy stage in order to do a production of A Christmas Carol. We then see the story through the eyes of a young viewer, as the cardboard sets and toys are transformed into a fantastic and vivid tale.




The film will feature the voice talent of Carey Mulligan (Drive), Martin Freeman (Sherlock), Daniel Kaluuya (Get Out), and Andy Serkis (The Lord of the Rings). The film will be co-directed by Documentarians Jacqui and David Morris of Frith Street Films.

“Quickfire is very excited to be involved in this startlingly original but incredibly accessible film,” said James Atherton and Jan Pace of Quickfire, a co-financier. “David and Jacqui have shown themselves to be masters of original filmmaking which has proven highly successful both critically and commercially.”

David Morris, who has adapted the story, said: “In A Christmas Carol, Dickens wrote one of literature’s most perfectly constructed stories – a simple and moving tale of redemption that has struck a chord with a worldwide audience, having been translated into almost every conceivable language. With the help of a great cast and crew, we believe that we have succeeded in retelling that story in an innovative way, that faithfully expresses what Dickens was trying to say.”



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