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Kath

Word of the Day – Corporeity

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Corporeity (noun) (rare)

kor-por-ree-it-ee

The quality of having a physical body or existence.

Early 17th century: from French corporéité or medieval Latin corporeitas, from Latin corporeus ‘composed of flesh’, from corpus, corpor- ‘body’.

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The Talisman Finally Getting an Adaptation, more than 30 years after Spielberg bought rights

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Almost a year ago we brought you the news that Stephen Spielberg was calling for an adaptation to Stephen King and Peter Straub’s collaboration The Talisman. In an interview last year Spielberg confessed that he has actually owned the rights to the novel since 1982 after reading it and falling in love with it, and now we finally have confirmation that an adaptation is indeed to be created.

Mike Barker, director of Outlander and The Handmaid’s Tale has been hired for the project, to tell the story of a young boy named Jack Sawyer and his quest through a monstrous dimension to find the mystical title object that might cure his dying mother, and even save two worlds in the process.

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Word of the Day – Gambit

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Gambit (noun)

gam-bit

An act or remark that is calculated to gain an advantage, especially at the outset of a situation.

(in chess) an opening move in which a player makes a sacrifice, typically of a pawn, for the sake of a compensating advantage.

Mid 17th century: originally gambett, from Italian gambetto, literally ‘tripping up’, from gamba ‘leg’.

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Anthony Doerr’s All The Light We Cannot See Coming to Netflix

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It’s been announced that Netflix is to adapt Anthony Doerr’s WWII themed novel into a limited series on the streaming channel. The novel, which won the Pulitzer Prize was a favourite with award judges and readers alike and we’re sure this news will be music to the ears of many.

The heartbreaking All the Light We Cannot See is set in World War II and tells the parallel stories of a French girl, who is blind, and a German boy. Marie-Laure and her father escape Paris to a seaside town when the Nazis arrive, carrying with them a precious jewel. Meanwhile German ophan, Werner is a self taught radio expert who is enlisted by the Nazis to use this ability against the French Resistance. As they both try and survive the devastation of the war, their lives collide in spectacular fashion.

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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Illustrated Finally has a Release Date

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When the Harry Potter illustrated series by Jim Kay was first announced we were promised a book a year, making buying Christmas presents very easy! However, when it came to the Autumn of 2018 it was announced that there would be no Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Illustrated in time for Christmas.

Rumour was that Jim Kay was struggling to finish in time, given the length of the later books. If true it’s not great news as it means that it’s likely to be an ongoing problem as the books get longer.

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5 Caryl Phillips Quotes That’ll Make You Want to Read His Books

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Caryl Phillips (13th March 1958) is a Kittitian- British novelist and playwright, best known for his award winning novels. His work often focuses on the experiences of people of the African diaspora in England, the Caribbean, and the USA. As well as writing, Phillips has worked as an academic at various institutions including Amherst College, and Yale University, where he has held the position of Professor of English since 2005.

To date, Caryl Phillips has written more than a dozen novels, historical fiction and plays. Today we’re going to bring attention to some of those works with some quotes and the books they come from.
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The Longlist for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019 is here

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Founded in 1996, the Women’s Prize for Fiction is a literary award, for women, by women and since its inception it’s become one of the most prestigious literary awards given out each year.

Earlier this month the 2019 longlist for the Women’s Prize for Fiction was announced and we have that featured below. Coming up on April 29th will be the shortlist and we’ll bring you that as it happens, then the winner will be announced on June 5th.

Here’s that longlist and what a great list of books we have this year.

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