10 John Steinbeck Quotes that are as True Today

By February 27, 2017Authors, Quotations

John Steinbeck was a prolific author, social commentator and fighter for social justice and is considered to be one of the greatest Americans to have ever lived. Born on 27th February 1902 Steinbeck wrote 27 books during his career including sixteen novels, six nonfiction works and five collections of short stories. His books are as popular today as they ever were and regularly make up entries on school reading lists and required reading.

With so much writing to choose from, we’re spoiled for choice when picking quotes but here are ten that we think are just as true today as when they were written.

“Maybe ever’body in the whole damn world is scared of each other.”

~ Of Mice and Men

 

“I believe a strong woman may be stronger than a man, particularly if she happens to have love in her heart. I guess a loving woman is indestructible.”

~ East of Eden

 

“A sad soul can kill you quicker, far quicker, than a germ.”

~ Travels with Charley: In Search of America

 

“No man really knows about other human beings. The best he can do is to suppose that they are like himself.”

~ The Winter of Our Discontent

 

“It has always seemed strange to me…The things we admire in men, kindness and generosity, openness, honesty, understanding and feeling, are the concomitants of failure in our system. And those traits we detest, sharpness, greed, acquisitiveness, meanness, egotism and self-interest, are the traits of success. And while men admire the quality of the first they love the produce of the second.”

~ Cannery Row

 



“There’s more beauty in truth, even if it is dreadful beauty.”

~ East of Eden

“I guess there are never enough books.”

~ A John Steinbeck Encyclopedia

 

“I believe that there is one story in the world, and only one. . . . Humans are caught—in their lives, in their thoughts, in their hungers and ambitions, in their avarice and cruelty, and in their kindness and generosity too—in a net of good and evil. . . . There is no other story. A man, after he has brushed off the dust and chips of his life, will have left only the hard, clean questions: Was it good or was it evil? Have I done well—or ill?”

~ East of Eden

 

“Try to understand men. If you understand each other you will be kind to each other. Knowing a man well never leads to hate and almost always leads to love.”

~ East of Eden

 

“What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.”

~ Travels with Charley: In Search of America

 

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2 Comments

  • Gopalbhai Trivedi says:

    Why donot you introduce a feature in your regular posts on Facebook and otherwise so that if you want to share the artcle and/or quotes or fotos from your posts on Whatsaapp, Googleplus, Instagram, it can be uploaded easily…like The newspapers -Times of India and Economic Times published in India!It will give you free publicity and your posts can be accessed by others.on your website! Thanks!

  • Chennakesa Singh says:

    There is one quote of Jhon Stein Beck, in “Grapes of wrath , ” The line between hunger and anger is very thin,,”. I read that great book of that great writers when I was doing my post graduation. I admire him a lot.

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