10 John Steinbeck Quotes that are as True Today

By February 27, 2017Authors, Quotations

John Steinbeck was a prolific author, social commentator and fighter for social justice and is considered to be one of the greatest Americans to have ever lived. Born on 27th February 1902 Steinbeck wrote 27 books during his career including sixteen novels, six nonfiction works and five collections of short stories. His books are as popular today as they ever were and regularly make up entries on school reading lists and required reading.

With so much writing to choose from, we’re spoiled for choice when picking quotes but here are ten that we think are just as true today as when they were written.

“Maybe ever’body in the whole damn world is scared of each other.”

~ Of Mice and Men

 

“I believe a strong woman may be stronger than a man, particularly if she happens to have love in her heart. I guess a loving woman is indestructible.”

~ East of Eden

 

“A sad soul can kill you quicker, far quicker, than a germ.”

~ Travels with Charley: In Search of America

 

“No man really knows about other human beings. The best he can do is to suppose that they are like himself.”

~ The Winter of Our Discontent

 

“It has always seemed strange to me…The things we admire in men, kindness and generosity, openness, honesty, understanding and feeling, are the concomitants of failure in our system. And those traits we detest, sharpness, greed, acquisitiveness, meanness, egotism and self-interest, are the traits of success. And while men admire the quality of the first they love the produce of the second.”

~ Cannery Row

 



“There’s more beauty in truth, even if it is dreadful beauty.”

~ East of Eden

“I guess there are never enough books.”

~ A John Steinbeck Encyclopedia

 

“I believe that there is one story in the world, and only one. . . . Humans are caught—in their lives, in their thoughts, in their hungers and ambitions, in their avarice and cruelty, and in their kindness and generosity too—in a net of good and evil. . . . There is no other story. A man, after he has brushed off the dust and chips of his life, will have left only the hard, clean questions: Was it good or was it evil? Have I done well—or ill?”

~ East of Eden

 

“Try to understand men. If you understand each other you will be kind to each other. Knowing a man well never leads to hate and almost always leads to love.”

~ East of Eden

 

“What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.”

~ Travels with Charley: In Search of America

 

Terry Pratchett: His World – A Review of the Exhibition

By | Authors, Guest Blogs, Literary Events, News | No Comments
On until January 2018, the Salisbury Museum with donations and support from The Estate of Terry Pratchett, and Paul Kidby – Sir Terry Pratchett’s artist of choice – present an exhibition entitled ‘Terry Pratchett: His World’.

The exhibition is a unique collection of artefacts which portray his amazing life and career, from his first novel The Carpet People which was published in 1971 to his later novels including the Discworld series. Artwork from the Discworld novels including over 40 original illustrations by Paul Kidby adorn the walls and will make any Discworld fan nostalgic for the books.

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The Private Lives of Authors: Sylvia Plath

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Many people know about Sylvia Plath’s writing, her relationship with Ted Hughes, and her battle with mental illness. A little known fact about Plath, however, was her passion for beekeeping.

Her love for bees began with her father, Otto Plath, who was a bumble bee expert.  Otto Plath’s book Bumblebees and Their Ways was published in 1934 and is still used today. Plath’s father grew up in Germany where he gained the nickname Beinen-Konig, meaning King of the Bees. Boston University recognised his knowledge and passion, giving him a place on their academic staff as the Professor of Entomology.

 

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Philip K. Dick: From Book to Film – A Video Essay

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Philip K. Dick December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982 was an American writer notable for his works of science fiction where his writing is dominated by authoritarian themes, alternate universes and altered states of consciousness, many of which have been adapted for film and television.

His work has spanned many decades, and you can often age people by what they know him for. In the early 80s when the movie adaptation was released, we all passed around copies of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, today The Man in the High Castle is big news thanks to Amazon. Read More

Philip Pullman’s New Novel Accidentally Published Early

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Readers in the Netherlands have had a bit of a treat this week as Philip Pullman’s new novel The Book of Dust has been accidentally published in the country several weeks early.

The Book of Dust: Volume 1 ‘La Belle Sauvage’ was due for worldwide publication on 19th October but due to a mix up, Dutch publishers Uitgeverij Prometheus distributed copies early, seeing copies of the books hit the shelves on 4th October.

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The Private Lives of Authors: Ernest Hemingway

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Ernest Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Illinois in the USA in 1899.

He was guided by his parents to enjoy the fruits of a suburban, middle class life with music lessons, and regular trips to the lakes and woods of North Michigan. His father would take Ernest for hunting and fishing trips, and these excursions would influence his profound love of nature, often reflected in his later work.

Despite professing his dislike for his musician mother, Ernest attributes the rhythm and contour of his writing to his musical background. Hemingway biographer Michael S. Reynolds explains how Hemingway in fact mirrored his mother’s vivacity. Perhaps their similarities partly caused Ernest’s scorn for his mother.

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Roald Dahl’s Charlie Was Originally Written As A Black Character.

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In an interview with BBC Radio 4 last month, Roald Dahl’s widow, Liccy Dahl, revealed that the “…first Charlie that he wrote about was a little black boy. I don’t know (why it was changed). It’s a great pity.”

Dahl biographer, Donald Sturrock, told the Today Programme:

“I can tell you that it was his agent who thought it was a bad idea, when the book was first published, to have a black hero. She said people would ask: ‘Why?'”

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2 Comments

  • Gopalbhai Trivedi says:

    Why donot you introduce a feature in your regular posts on Facebook and otherwise so that if you want to share the artcle and/or quotes or fotos from your posts on Whatsaapp, Googleplus, Instagram, it can be uploaded easily…like The newspapers -Times of India and Economic Times published in India!It will give you free publicity and your posts can be accessed by others.on your website! Thanks!

  • Chennakesa Singh says:

    There is one quote of Jhon Stein Beck, in “Grapes of wrath , ” The line between hunger and anger is very thin,,”. I read that great book of that great writers when I was doing my post graduation. I admire him a lot.

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