10 Straight to the Point Ruth Rendell Quotes

By February 17, 2017Authors, Quotations

Creator of the Inspector Wexford series of novels Ruth Rendell (17 February 1930 – 2 May 2015) was an English author of thrillers and psychological murder mysteries. 

Born in in South Woodford, Essex Ruth grew up in a multilingual family and could speak both Swedish and Danish from a young age. After leaving school Ruth worked as a feature writer for her local Essex paper, the Chigwell Times. This job however was shortlived when she was forced to resign after submitting a report on a dinner she was meant to attend but had not and had therefor omitted to mention that the speaker had dropped dead halfway through his speech.

Credited with creating a separate brand of crime fiction that deeply explored the psychological background of criminals and their victims, many of them mentally afflicted or otherwise socially isolated she is a favourite author of many crime fiction fans; here we have collected together 10 Straight to the Point Ruth Rendell Quotes to celebrate her life.

“Many emotions go under the name of love, and almost any one of them will for a while divert the mind from the real, true, and perfect thing.”

“The trouble with psychology is that it doesn’t take human nature into account.”

“We no more forget the faces of our enemies than of those we love.”

“I can’t exist without books.”

“The knives of jealousy are honed on details.”



“I think to be driven to want to kill must be such a terrible burden.”

“While most of the things you’ve worried about have never happened, it’s a different story with the things you haven’t worried about. They are the ones that happen.”

“Reading is becoming a kind of specialist activity, and that strikes terror into the heart of people who love reading.”

“What I mind in modern society very much is the awful lack of grammar.”

“I don’t think the world is a particularly pleasant place.”

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