8 Lovely Quotes from Louis L’Amour

By March 22, 2018 Authors, Quotations

Louis L’Amour (22nd March 1908 – June 10th 1988) was an American novelist and short story writer, writing mostly Western novels and frontier stories. During his lifetime L’Amour was a prolific writer, publishing stories from 1938 until his death. At the time of his death L’Amour had published 105 works and every one is still in print today.

This makes L’Amour one of the most popular writers the world has ever seen, and today we’re celebrating the author by sharing some of our favourite quotes from his books.

“The trail is the thing, not the end of the trail. Travel too fast, and you miss all you are traveling for.”

 

“When a man is one of a kind, he will be lonely wherever he is.”

 

“Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.”

 

“Adventure is just a romantic name for trouble. It sounds swell when you write about it, but it’s hell when you meet it face to face in a dark and lonely place.”

 



“A mistake constantly made by those who should know better is to judge people of the past by our standards rather than their own. The only way men or women can be judged is against the canvas of their own time.”

 

“For one who reads, there is no limit to the number of lives that may be lived, for fiction, biography, and history offer an inexhaustible number of lives in many parts of the world, in all periods of time.”

 

“I do not think much of ages. People are people. What does it matter how old or young they are? It is a category, and I do not like categories. It is a sort of pigeonhole or a label.”

 

“Knowledge is like money: To be of value it must circulate, and in circulating it can increase in quantity and, hopefully, in value.”

 

Louis L’Amour books

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