Agatha Christie’s Secret Letters to be Revealed

By July 13, 2017Authors, Literature, News

Today we bring you the news that as part of the HarperCollins 200th anniversary the publisher will be releasing ‘the secret history between Agatha Christie and her long-standing publisher, HarperCollins’.

The ‘candid photographs’ and ‘touching letters’ were unearthed from a Glasgow archive and will form part of a new exhibition celebrating the company’s 200th anniversary.

The items show a relationship between Christie and her William ‘Billy’ Collins spanning 50 years until the author’s death in 1976 aged 85, and are made up of many discussions include cover designs, plots and publishing schedules. The touching letters discuss some of the issues of the day, like attempting to obtain tennis balls during the war, the gossip from publishing parties and more.

Christie is still one of the best selling authors of all time and is still published by HarperCollins to this day. The publishing house holds thousands of books, photographs, and correspondence at the Glasgow archive and these documents give an insight into the author’s long career.

If you’re a big fan of Agatha Christie then the material will all be displayed at the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival in Harrogate later this month, between 20th and 23rd July. The collection will then move to a permanent home at Greenway, Christie’s former home in Devon, now managed by the National Trust.

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