J. D Salinger’s Unseen Works to be Published

By February 9, 2019 Authors, News

The son of J. D Salinger has confirmed that the author of The Catcher in the Rye wrote a significant amount of work that has never been seen and that he and his father’s widow are preparing the previously unseen work for publication.

Its eight years since Salinger died in 2010 leaving behind a body of published works including the iconic The Catcher in the Rye, Franny and Zooey, For Esme with Love and Squalor and other works. However, the author had not published anything since 1965’s New Yorker story Hapworth 16, 1924, his last published work.

For years rumours have been circulating that the author of one of the 20th centuries most iconic novels must have written other stories during the years he lived, fairly reclusively, in the New Hampshire village of Cornish. Last week, in an interview with the Guardian newspaper, Matt Salinger confirmed that his father never stopped writing and that he intends to share it all ‘at some point’.

Matt says his father was full of ideas and thoughts. He said “He’d be driving the car and he’d pull over to write something and laugh to himself – sometimes he’d read it to me, sometimes he wouldn’t – and next to every chair he had a notebook. He just decided that the best thing for his writing was not to have a lot of interactions with people, literary types in particular. He didn’t want to be playing in those poker games, he wanted to, as he would encourage every would-be writer to do, you know, stew in your own juices.”

In 2013 a documentary on the author suggested that five new books from the author were coming, including a short story featuring Holden Caulfield, and a story based on Salinger’s brief marriage to Sylvia, a Nazi collaborator, but his son was keen to squash those rumours, stating that the documentary was made without consultation with the family.

Matt did not reveal specifics about the new stories but did state that it wasn’t yet ready for publication. Watch this space for more news, we certainly will be!

Data Reveals the Most Popular Books are Written by Men

By | Authors, News, Reading Habits | No Comments
Many people just pick up a book, read it and decide from there whether they love it or not, for others the gender of the author is important. The gender gap in literature has been present for years, perpetuated through history by male nom de plumes and lack of respect generally for female literature.

Some bookshops have even gone so far as to create visual experiments to show how many of the shelves are dominated by male authors.

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Andrea Levy, dies age 62

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British author Andrea Levy was born on 7 March 1956 to Jamaican parents. Her father came to Britain on Empire Windrush in 1948, and her mother followed not long after. It is no surprise then, that Levy’s experience of growing up black in a country that was still predominately white is reflected in her novels which focus on the Windrush Generation, British Jamaicans and their experiences of racial, cultural and national identity.

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J. D Salinger’s Unseen Works to be Published

By | Authors, News | No Comments
The son of J. D Salinger has confirmed that the author of The Catcher in the Rye wrote a significant amount of work that has never been seen and that he and his father’s widow are preparing the previously unseen work for publication.

Its eight years since Salinger died in 2010 leaving behind a body of published works including the iconic The Catcher in the Rye, Franny and Zooey, For Esme with Love and Squalor and other works. However, the author had not published anything since 1965’s New Yorker story Hapworth 16, 1924, his last published work.
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Rosamunde Pilcher, Author of The Shell Seekers, Dead

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Rosamunde Pilcher, author of The Shell Seekers, and other wholesome novels has died at the age of 94 her agent confirmed yesterday. The novelist who penned nearly thirty romance and fiction books between 1949 and 2000 when she retired died following a short illness.

Pilcher was born Rosamunde E. M. L Scott on 22nd September 1924 in Lelant on the north coast of Cornwall and began writing aged 7. She was just 15 when she had her first short story published. In the late 1940s Pilcher began to write for Mills & Boon, publishing her stories under the pseudonym Jane Fraser.

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Lost LGBT Pulp Classic, Work for a Million, returning to print

By | Authors, News, Reading Excerpts | No Comments
Work for a Million is a novel by Eve Zaremba which was first published in 1986. It was written by an out lesbian author and is described as being the first pulp novel to feature an out lesbian detective, Helen Keremos, as its protagonist.

To celebrate their five-year anniversary, a Canadian publisher, Bedside press, are reprinting the original novel with a new cover by Sami Kivelä, finally bringing this work back from its long out-of-print stint. Read More



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