Ruskin Bond the Hip Hop Nature Boy

By May 19, 2017Authors, Video

Ruskin Bond was born on the 19th of May 1934 in Kasauli, and over the years lived in both the UK and all over India. His works have been influenced by his early life living at the foothills of the Himalayas.

His first novel, The Room On the Roof, was written when he was 17 and was partly based on his experiences at Dehradun, in a small rented room on a roof.

His first children’s book was The Angry River, published in 1972. On writing for children, Ruskin said, “I had a pretty lonely childhood and it helps me to understand a child better.”

Ruskin has written a series of autobiographical work: Rain in the Mountains, about his years spent in Mussoorie; Scenes from a Writer’s Life based on his life up until he was 21, and Scenes from a Writer’s Life focuses on his English adventures.

“It also tells a lot about my parents”, he says, “The book ends with the publication of my first novel and my decision to make writing my livelihood…Basically, it describes how I became a writer”.



Ruskin has been a prolific and varied author over 50 years, writing fiction, short stories, novella, sprinkled with some autobiographical aspects. He has also written some non-fiction, romanceand children’s literature. On writing essays and short stories he has said how he considers himself a “visual writer” imagining the story like a film and then writing it down.

His inspirations and personal favourite books are Just William by Richmal Crompton, and classics by Mark Twain, Lewis Carroll, and Charles Dickens.

Check out a sweet little recording of Ruskin Bond himself reading one of his poems Hip Hop Nature Boy to his audience. The poem is written below for clarity as the sound recording is not brilliant.

Hip Hop Nature Boy by Ruskin Bond

When I was seven,

And climbing trees,

I stepped into a hive of bees.

Badly stung and mad with pain,

I danced the hip-hop in the rain.

Hip-hop, I’m a nature boy,

Mother Nature’s pride and joy!

When I was twelve,

Still climbing trees,

I fell instead-

And landed on my head.

Feeling lighter,

I thought I might become a writer.

Hip-hop, dancing in the rain,

A nature-writer I became!

With Nature being my natural bent,

At twenty I took out my tent,

And spent the night beside a Nadi,

Wearing only vest and chuddee.

At crack of dawn I woke to find

A crocodile was close behind,

And smiling broadly!

In times of crises at my best,

I did not trouble to get dressed,

But fled towards the Gulf of Kutch,

With fond salaams to muggermuch!

Mother Nature once again

Found me dancing on the plain,

Nanga-Panga in the rain!

Growing older, even bolder,

Took a winding mountain trail,

Up a hill and down a dale,

All to see a mountain-quail.

The quail was extinct, long expired,

I was limping, very tired;

Thought I saw a comfy cot

In the corner of a hut.

Feeling grateful, I sank down

Upon a blanket soft as down.

Blanket rose up all at once,

Gave a shudder, then a pounce.

Stumbling in the darkness there,

I’d be disturbed a big brown bear!

I did not stop to say goodnight,

But fled into the open night.

Hip-hop in the rain,

Dancing to that old refrain.

Growing old, I thought it safer

In my tryst with Mother Nature,

To grow flowers-

Roses, dahlias,

Poppies, sweet peas, rare azaleas,

Candy tuft and tiny tansies,

Violets sweet and naughty pansies…

A lovely garden I’d constructed,

Birds and bees were soon inducted.

Bees! Did I say bees?

They were buzzing all around me-

Angry, diving down upon me;

For where their hive had been suspended,

By accident it lay upended!

Dear Reader, if you must

In Nature put your trust,

Stay away from a swarm of bees

And strange crocs lurking under trees,

Or else, like me, you’ll dance with pain,

While doing the hip-hop in the rain.



Honouring Douglas Adams with Towel Day on the 25th of May!

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Happy Towel Day, Reading Addicts!

In case you didn’t know, Towel Day is a celebration that happens every year on the 25th of May, as a tribute to the late author Douglas Adams who died in May, 2001.

On this day, fans around the universe honour him by carrying a towel, reading his novels, and generally spreading the word about the great man.

Fans of Adams’ work, and in particular The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, started this celebration 2 weeks after Douglas died in 2001, and since then many of us have been honouring him in our own ways…

An Italian Orchestra- the Magister Espresso Orchestra– produced this beautiful video as a tribute to Adams, for Towel Day.

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7 Scandalous Sayings from Dame Barbara Cartland

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The English romance novelist, Dame Barbara Cartland, was born on the 9th of July in 1901 and died on the 21st of May 2000.

She was a prolific best-selling author and one of the most successful of the 20th century. She wrote 723 novels all of which were translated into around 38 languages, and in 1976 was entered in the Guinness World Records for the most novels published in that single year.

Cartland was a self-professed “expert on romance”, however as she became more conservative in her later years this became a focus for ridicule. Barbara’s first novels were considered shocking and risqué however her later books were relatively tame, often involving virginal heroines and were lacking in saucy situations.

Her popularity never wained, though, and she will always be known as the Dame of romantic fiction.

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Ruskin Bond the Hip Hop Nature Boy

By | Authors, Video | No Comments
Ruskin Bond was born on the 19th of May 1934 in Kasauli, and over the years lived in both the UK and all over India. His works have been influenced by his early life living at the foothills of the Himalayas.

His first novel, The Room On the Roof, was written when he was 17 and was partly based on his experiences at Dehradun, in a small rented room on a roof.

His first children’s book was The Angry River, published in 1972. On writing for children, Ruskin said, “I had a pretty lonely childhood and it helps me to understand a child better.”

Ruskin has written a series of autobiographical work: Rain in the Mountains, about his years spent in Mussoorie; Scenes from a Writer’s Life based on his life up until he was 21, and Scenes from a Writer’s Life focuses on his English adventures.

“It also tells a lot about my parents”, he says, “The book ends with the publication of my first novel and my decision to make writing my livelihood…Basically, it describes how I became a writer”.

Read More

Visually Impaired Teenager Publishes First Book

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12 year old Julia Fleming, from Arab in Alabama, USA, is an award-winning, intelligent, young woman with a bright future in writing.

Earlier this year Julia won a State Literature title for students in grades 4-6. She surprised her teachers, parents, and friends by entering but not telling a soul when she did! The competition entailed taking a book they’d read and writing a letter to the author of the novel to explain how it impacted their lives. Julia did this without letting on that she is, in fact, legally blind.

Julia explained to WAFF News: “I’m legally blind, which means that I’m not totally blind, but that I was born totally blind,” She told of how she has had artificial cornea transplants to gain her some limited vision.

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10 Bookish Quotes from Gary Paulsen

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Gary Paulsen was born on the 17th of May, 1939 in Minnesota, USA.

Paulsen is a Young Adult literature writer and is best known for coming of age stories based in and around the wilderness. He writes primarily for teens, and is the author of over 200 books, more than 200 magazine articles and short stories, and has even written several plays.

The American Library Association awarded him the Margaret Edwards award in 1997 for his “significant and lasting” contribution in writing for teenagers. Three of Paulsen’s books (Dogsong, Hatchet, and The Winter Room) were also runners-up for the premier ALA annual book award for children’s literature, the Newbery Medal.

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