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Authors

The YA Book Prize Opens for Submissions

By | Authors, Children's Literature, Literary Awards, News | No Comments
Do you know anyone who’s written a brilliant young adult novel? If so you may want to give them the heads up as submissions open for the YA Book Prize 2018.

The YA Book Prize has been running in the UK and Ireland since 2014, and serves to champion the breadth and brilliance of Young Adult writing. The deadline is a couple of months away yet so authors have time to prepare! Read More

10 Thoughtful Quotes By E.M. Forster

By | Authors, Quotations | No Comments
Edward Morgan Forster was born in London in 1879, and died in June 1970. As a novelist, essayist, and short story writer he published under the shortened name of E.M. Forster. Forster is best known for his ironic and wry novels full of thoughtful prose looking at class difference in early 20th-century British society. He shone a light on hypocrisy in the social order, and with his 1910 novel Howards End, he offered a humanistic examination of life. His mindful understanding is summed up in the epigraph to Howards End:

“Only connect”.

Here are ten of our favourite Forster quotes from various novels… Let us know if we have missed your most loved Froster quote.

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Terry Pratchett: His World – A Review of the Exhibition

By | Authors, Guest Blogs, Literary Events, News | No Comments
On until January 2018, the Salisbury Museum with donations and support from The Estate of Terry Pratchett, and Paul Kidby – Sir Terry Pratchett’s artist of choice – present an exhibition entitled ‘Terry Pratchett: His World’.

The exhibition is a unique collection of artefacts which portray his amazing life and career, from his first novel The Carpet People which was published in 1971 to his later novels including the Discworld series. Artwork from the Discworld novels including over 40 original illustrations by Paul Kidby adorn the walls and will make any Discworld fan nostalgic for the books.

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The Private Lives of Authors: Sylvia Plath

By | Authors, Poetry | No Comments
Many people know about Sylvia Plath’s writing, her relationship with Ted Hughes, and her battle with mental illness. A little known fact about Plath, however, was her passion for beekeeping.

Her love for bees began with her father, Otto Plath, who was a bumble bee expert.  Otto Plath’s book Bumblebees and Their Ways was published in 1934 and is still used today. Plath’s father grew up in Germany where he gained the nickname Beinen-Konig, meaning King of the Bees. Boston University recognised his knowledge and passion, giving him a place on their academic staff as the Professor of Entomology.

 

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Philip K. Dick: From Book to Film – A Video Essay

By | Authors, Video | No Comments
Philip K. Dick December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982 was an American writer notable for his works of science fiction where his writing is dominated by authoritarian themes, alternate universes and altered states of consciousness, many of which have been adapted for film and television.

His work has spanned many decades, and you can often age people by what they know him for. In the early 80s when the movie adaptation was released, we all passed around copies of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, today The Man in the High Castle is big news thanks to Amazon. Read More

Philip Pullman’s New Novel Accidentally Published Early

By | Authors, New Releases | No Comments
Readers in the Netherlands have had a bit of a treat this week as Philip Pullman’s new novel The Book of Dust has been accidentally published in the country several weeks early.

The Book of Dust: Volume 1 ‘La Belle Sauvage’ was due for worldwide publication on 19th October but due to a mix up, Dutch publishers Uitgeverij Prometheus distributed copies early, seeing copies of the books hit the shelves on 4th October.

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The Private Lives of Authors: Ernest Hemingway

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Ernest Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Illinois in the USA in 1899.

He was guided by his parents to enjoy the fruits of a suburban, middle class life with music lessons, and regular trips to the lakes and woods of North Michigan. His father would take Ernest for hunting and fishing trips, and these excursions would influence his profound love of nature, often reflected in his later work.

Despite professing his dislike for his musician mother, Ernest attributes the rhythm and contour of his writing to his musical background. Hemingway biographer Michael S. Reynolds explains how Hemingway in fact mirrored his mother’s vivacity. Perhaps their similarities partly caused Ernest’s scorn for his mother.

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Roald Dahl’s Charlie Was Originally Written As A Black Character.

By | Authors, Children's Literature | No Comments
In an interview with BBC Radio 4 last month, Roald Dahl’s widow, Liccy Dahl, revealed that the “…first Charlie that he wrote about was a little black boy. I don’t know (why it was changed). It’s a great pity.”

Dahl biographer, Donald Sturrock, told the Today Programme:

“I can tell you that it was his agent who thought it was a bad idea, when the book was first published, to have a black hero. She said people would ask: ‘Why?'”

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