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Literary Places

Property developers name their new community ‘Gilead’.

By | Literary Places, Literature | No Comments
Gilead‘ is known to many literature fans, and television watchers, as the theocratic, authoritarian republic run by an ultra-religious US government created by Margaret Atwood. In Gilead women have no rights, and those unfortunate enough to be able to bear children are forced into sexual slavery. Free speech doesn’t exist and any hint of backlash from the women results in drastic action from those in charge.

Bearing all that in mind: would you name your new community development Gilead?! A group in New South Wales, Australia, has done just that.

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Charles Dickens’ Contribution to Science to Feature in Exhibition

By | Authors, Culture, Literary Events, Literary Places, News | No Comments
Charles Dickens: Man of Science is a current exhibition running at the Charles Dickens Museum until November 11th and the exhibition is looking at the author’s contribution to science, and notably medicine.

Dickens astute observations on human behaviours means he spotted many illnesses and their symptoms before they were recognised by the medical community and his descriptions so accurate that they can be used to build correlation between symptoms and disease.
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£2m Revamp Complete for National Centre for Writing

By | Culture, Literary Places, News, On Writing | No Comments
The National Centre for writing relaunches in Norwich this week following a £2 million revamp for the historic Dragon Hall. It was previously known as the Writers’ Centre, Norwich but now the facility is to be a “Physical and digital space to explore the artistic and social power of creative writing, and support the creation and enjoyment of world literature” according to a spokesman interviewed by The Bookseller this week.

Parts of the historic Dragon Hall date back to 1430, meaning any renovations had to be sympathetic. The project was given the go ahead back in 2016 and was backed by a number of high profile patrons including Margaret Atwood, Ali Smith, Elif Shafak, J. M Coetzee, and Sarah Perry.
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10 Things Your Local Library Needs

By | Libraries, Literary Places | No Comments
A library is not strictly a building full of books to borrow- it is much, much more!

All around the world librarians and local councils are ensuring they keep up with the modern world by offering fun and interesting things alongside the books.

From a calculation of your savings, to emergency bubble wrap for times of stress- and everything in between- here is a list of ten things you wish your local library has!

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10 Places from Literature We’d Love to Visit This Summer

By | Literary Places, Literature | No Comments
Summer is right around the corner and we’re all looking forward to basking in the sun, hitting the beach, and enjoying warm evenings with friends. No doubt many of you are looking forward to a quick getaway for a week or two and there are certainly many far off and interesting places to visit. From the seemingly buoyant city of Venice to the breathtaking national parks found across the United States, we’re spoiled for choice when it comes to the real world but, for bibliophiles, there are also many other special places to visit, places that can only be explored via the books within which they exist. Read More

Pride and Prejudice House’s £33 Million Renovation

By | Adaptations, Literary Places | No Comments
Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, where the 2005 film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice was filmed, is due for a renovation.

The Duke of Devonshire had decided the house needed a certain amount of care and attention, and the installation of WIFI, if it is to be financially viable in the future. It is said to be the most costly and time-consuming renovation for nearly 200 years.

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Eight Authors Write Ghost Stories Inspired by Heritage Sites Across England

By | Literary Places, New Releases | No Comments
If you’re planning to get away from it all this Summer, and fancy getting in some early spooks before October rolls around, then you’ll want to check out Eight Ghosts: The English Heritage Book of New Ghost Stories. The book contains eight spooky stories that have been written by eight different authors, each inspired by English Heritage sites.

The authors include the likes of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, Mark Haddon, and author of The Essex Serpent, Sarah Perry. Each author was given an historic site, and challenged with writing a ghost story set within the walls of said site. Locations include York Cold War Bunker, Dover Castle and Housesteads Roman Fort on Hadrian’s Wall. Read More