Category

Literature

To Kill a Mockingbird Removed from Mississippi School Reading List

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To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee’s classic novel about racism in the American South has been removed from a school’s reading list because language in the book “makes people uncomfortable.”

The Biloxi school board this week decided that the novel should be removed from the curriculum, though it will still be available in the school’s library. The vice-president of the school board told the Sun Herald newspaper that they had received several complaints about the book because the language it uses makes people feel uncomfortable.

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A Guide To Spotting Fake Reviews Online

By | Guest Blogs, Literature | No Comments
After Hillary Clinton’s memoir “What Happened” was released, and received reviews almost immediately, Amazon had to delete hundreds of unverified reviews from the site.

It can be worrying for any online shopper to purchase something without recommendation, and many of us look to reviews to help determine whether the purchase worth our money.

Sometimes it is not obvious at first glance that a review is fake, and bought or planted by promoters of the product. Floship have provided a useful guide to spotting fakery in reviews, particularly Amazon reviews, besides the usual ‘Verified Reviewer’ clue.

Follow the link below to see the full article and save yourself a lot of bother with fake reviews online!

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Novel Rejected Over 30 Times For Being “Too Gay”

By | Literature, New Releases | No Comments
A novel has been rejected over 30 times by publishers who cited that it was “too niche” just because it centred on a gay character. It was also said the story of Charlie Matthews’ obsession with Madonna was “too working class, too 80s, too immersed in pop culture, and too gay”.

The Madonna of Bolton by Matt Cain is a family drama and sees the protagonist Charlie’s obsession with the pop star Madonna. His infatuation with her “sees him through some tough times in life: being persecuted at school; fitting in at a posh university; a glamorous career in London; finding boyfriends; getting rid of boyfriends; growing up and family heartbreak”.

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Almost Two-Thirds Of The World’s Illiterate Adults Are Women.

By | Literature, News | One Comment
Global illiteracy is still a major issue in the 21st century with 774 million illiterate adults (people over the age of 15) all over the world.

493 million (two-thirds) of those illiterate adults are women. This discrepancy is shocking to many of us but it is one that needs to be addressed.

Back in 2010 the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation director-general, Irina Bokova, said: “newly literate women have a positive ripple effect on all development indicators”. Teaching women to read has a great positive affect on the development of themselves, their family and their community.

Katy Newell-Jones of Feed the Minds supports Bokova’s comments by adding: “On its own, literacy neither saves lives nor fills hungry mouths. However, we encounter women’s literacy time and time again as a valuable component in women’s empowerment. A woman who is able to keep her own business records is more likely to be able to manage her income and expenditure; and the children of a literate mother are more likely to complete their education.”

National Institute of Adult Continuing Education report on women’s right to literacy insists on an holistic approach to literacy education. It is more effective to teach reading and writing while linking it to practical and useful skills: “Literacy learning is particularly effective when it is linked to, integrated with or embedded in other learning. Such approaches produce stronger outcomes in both literacy and vocational education and training. Women who want to be successful traders, efficient farmers, contribute to school governance and rear healthy children must be equipped with the necessary, associated literacy skills.”

Check out the BBC video below for further insight into the global literacy problem.

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Romantic Book Covers Recreated With Normal Folk

By | Inspired by Literature, Literature | No Comments
You must have seen them on a library bookshelf, or perhaps you have read a few stashed in your bedside table? Romance literature with ever-so-slightly cheesy covers have been around since the early to mid-20th century. Mills and Boon cornered the market for the erotic novels and still produce them today. They were marketed as escapist literature for women in the 1930s, although there are some men who claim them as their guilty pleasure.

The covers usually depict a romantic scene between two people: usually a muscled man embracing a woman in a fit of passion. There has been some controversy over the years with the solely Caucasian characters and storylines centred on male dominance. Despite this, they remain ever-popular and provide an erotic escape into a world often unknown to their readers. Some feminist academics have even gone as far as to say they are feminist texts by introducing women to the concept of orgasms, and sexual liberation.

Val Derbyshire of the University of Sheffield, UK is a big fan. She say that the books are written for women, by women, and have much more value than many give them credit for.

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The Private Lives of Authors: Ernest Hemingway

By | Authors, Literature | No Comments
Ernest Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Illinois in the USA in 1899.

He was guided by his parents to enjoy the fruits of a suburban, middle class life with music lessons, and regular trips to the lakes and woods of North Michigan. His father would take Ernest for hunting and fishing trips, and these excursions would influence his profound love of nature, often reflected in his later work.

Despite professing his dislike for his musician mother, Ernest attributes the rhythm and contour of his writing to his musical background. Hemingway biographer Michael S. Reynolds explains how Hemingway in fact mirrored his mother’s vivacity. Perhaps their similarities partly caused Ernest’s scorn for his mother.

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National Books Awards 2017: Finalists Revealed

By | Literary Awards, Literature, News | One Comment
The finalists for the National Book Awards 2017 have been revealed today with 20 books across four main categories, fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature.

The National Book Award is a prestigious prize, the prize was established in 1936 by the American Booksellers Association, and while abandoned during WWII, was re-established in 1950. The award is giving to US authors, and the award ceremony takes place in November. Read More

Are Celebrity Authors Ruining Literature?

By | Children's Literature, Literature | No Comments
After the announcement of the World Book Day 2018 £1 titles, many authors have spoken out against the influx of celebrity authors. Interestingly, four out of the ten World Book Day £1 titles in 2018 are by celebrity authors.

In response to this news David Almond, author of Skellig, has stated that “the nation’s children are being shortchanged”.  Almond complained how “authors and illustrators are being scorned” by the list of television stars, reality show winners, and comedians.

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