Category

Poetry

Beautiful Cosmos by the eccentric Scottish poet Ivor Cutler

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Ivor Cutler was a Scottish poet and humorist born in Glasgow in 1923. He is best known for his appearances on the BBC Radio shows presented by John Peel, and for his work on The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour. 

His humour and eccentric way with words made Ivor a truly unique individual- often his stories are fantastical and absolute nonsense, with a twist of unnerving dourness.

His surreal observations are often seen as childlike, with stories that are often tinged with a dark naivety and whimsy.

Check out Beautiful Cosmos below, a lyrical poem written for the only woman in his life to truly understand him- Phyllis King- who co-wrote, and was another driving force behind his success.

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A 10-year-old dyslexic student’s ‘palindrome poem’ has gone viral

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A ‘palindrome poem’ written by 10-year-old student from the Southeast of England has gone viral thanks to their teacher sharing the poem on Twitter.

Jane Broadis, a primary school teacher in the UK, posted the inspiring poem on Twitter where it went viral within the day, reaching 47k retweets and 158k Likes so far. The young author, known only as ‘AO’, wrote the poem about their struggles with dyslexia- most importantly about people’s perceptions of those with dyslexia. It is a surprising, clever, and thought-provoking poem, and thousands of people fell in love with it all over the internet.

See for yourself below!

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How one boy fought back at bullies with poetry

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Poetry can be a great tool for working through your feelings and one British boy knows this all to well.

Alfie Coleiro from Eastbourne, had been bullied via anonymous messages sent on Instagram, his smartphone, and even via his Playstation. Horrifyingly, many of the nasty messages were telling him to kill himself, and that he should never have been born, however Alfie’s response was amazing.

Speaking to BBC Newsbeat, his father Jay remarked: “I didn’t have a clue he was writing the poem. He likes to share his emotions through music and stuff like that, so he went upstairs, wrote it and then showed it to me.”

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Poets Read Poems About Climate Change on a Melting Glacier

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Climate change is causing Greenland’s glaciers to melt, and the pacific island nations are noticing the increased amount of water caused by erosion of these mighty glaciers. In an effort to try and raise awareness about the colossal threat global warming poses, two poets came together on a melting glacier to recite a poem they’d written together.

The two had never met before when Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner traveled from the Marshall Islands in Micronesia to Greenland’s capital city Nuuk where she met Inuk poet Aka Niviâna. They then met up with a small film crew and journeyed on to an isolated area on southern Greenland’s ice sheet where they recited their poem “Rise” atop a melting glacier.

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The Controversy of Ezra Pound

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There’s no denying that Ezra Pound (30th October 1885 – 1st November 1972) was one of the greatest poets of the 20th century. Born in Idaho territory in 1885, Pound was the only child of English expatriate parents, Pound went to a Quaker school and had his first poetry published at 11 years old.

Into adulthood, Pound was credited with being a leading figure in Imagism, a movement derived from classical Chinese poetry, stressing clarity, precision, and economy of language. He’s also credited with being a major figure in early modernist poetry.
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2018 National Book Awards Longlist: Poetry

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This week we’re bringing you the longlist via the New Yorker for the National Book Awards 2018. So far we’ve had fiction, young people’s literature, and translated literature but today we’re looking at the poetry nominations.

The longlist for poetry is an eclectic collection with a range of poetry styles and collections. Some we’ve heard of, some poets are new to us, but we do know that if it’s in the longlist then it’s almost guaranteed to be a fantastic collection.

And here it is, the National Book Awards Longlist for Poetry 2018:

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Literary Laugharne: From 1172 to Dylan Thomas

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Don’t tell everyone, but last week I sneaked off on a little holiday down the coast and while I was there I went to spend a day in Laugharne. The small town is best known for being home to Dylan Thomas but less well known is its connection to Richard Hughes (A High Wind in Jamaica).

Laugharne is steeped in history, and was well before Thomas decided to reside there. It has a castle that dates back to the 1100s, laid siege by Cromwell in the 1600s but still standing in ruinous form today. The town also contains many fine examples of Georgian townhouses and is home to the Laugharne Corporation, the last surviving medieval corporation in the UK.

It is however, best known for being the home of Dylan Thomas and the town is scattered with landmarks connected to the author, from the boathouse, to his writing shed, the castle gazebo where he and Richard Hughes wrote together, the Dylan Thomas birthday walk, inspired by Poem in October, and his final resting place.
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Ted Hughes: in his own words

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Ted Hughes was born in Yorkshire, England on the 17th of August, 1930 and grew up in and around farmland where he learned to fish and hunt. His poetry is steeped with natural imagery, flora and fauna. The savagery of the natural world- both beautiful and violent- influenced him greatly, prompting him to use animals and nature as metaphorical devices.

Hughes’ terse yet powerful use of language, coloured by his West Riding dialect, created a hard energy to his work- emphatic but evocative, and never self-indulgent.

Watch below for a wonderful reading of The Crow by the poet himself.

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The Night of the Murdered Poets

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It sounds like the plot to a fantastic movie doesn’t it? Sadly the truth is a stain on history and yet another blot that fascism has left on our past.

On 12th August 1952, the execution of thirteen Soviet Jews in the Lubyanka Prison in Moscow in the then Soviet Union was carried out, the charges? Counterrevolutionary crimes and organised action meant to topple, undermine, or weaken the Soviet Union, whatever that means. Read More