Shirley Hughes’ Top 5 Best Selling Books

Shirley Hughes is a British author and illustrator best known for her Alfie and Annie Rose series. Born on the 16th of July in 1927, she has written over fifty books and has illustrated more than two hundred. As a best selling author she has managed to sell more than 11.5 million copies, winning a multitude of literature and illustration awards.

For many British children in particular, she has been a large part of the childhood literary experience. Her illustrations are warm and colourful, and invoke memories of home cooked meals and cuddling up with a parent or grandparent for story time.

Shirley Hughes has been popular since 1960 and her work still holds up today as pieces of wonderful children’s literature. As a celebration of her writing and illustration, we have collated her top 5 best selling books according to Amazon.

Happy reading!




1. Dogger

“When Dave loses his favourite toy, Dogger, he is desolate. But then Dogger turns up at the school summer fair, and everything seems all right – until someone else buys him before Dave can get the money!”

“Join Alfie and Annie Rose for Christmas! Alfie opens his advent calendar and makes cards and presents. He sings carols and decorates the tree. And he writes a special letter to Father Christmas… But what will Father Christmas bring on Christmas Day? It’s going to be such an exciting day!”

“Annie Rose and Alfie have lots of games they like to play together, like being scary monsters with Bernard, or running their own shop. But there are some things Annie Rose is too little to do and even some things Alfie would rather do without her. But if Annie Rose is ever sad or cross there is only one person who can make her feel better . . . her big brother.”

“In this collection of poems, a small girl and her baby brother romp through the changing seasons, taking pleasure in the different elements and weather conditions – sunshine, wind, rain, mist, snow. From the joys of the seaside to the miseries of the sickbed, the world of childhood is explored.”

“Alfie and his best friend Bernard have a day out full of surprises when they go to meet a very great person indeed. What’s more there are secret dens to explore, snowy skies, birthday fun and a very unexpected visitor on a special night-time trip! Join our little hero and his friends and family in a celebration of all things Alfie…”

An Introduction to Mary McCarthy

By | Authors | No Comments
Mary Therese McCarthy (June 21st, 1912 – October 25th, 1989) was an American novelist, critic and political activist born in Seattle, Washington. McCarthy learned loss at an early age, losing both her parents to the flu epidemic of 1918, a situation that led to a childhood of harsh treatment and abuse raised by an uncle and aunt at her catholic father’s parents’ home in Minneapolis, Minnesota. McCarthy explored the complexities of this time in her memoir Memories of a Catholic Girlhood. Read More

US Authors Campaigning Against ‘Kids in Cages’

By | Authors, Children's Literature, News, Political | No Comments
Wherever you are it’s unlikely that you haven’t heard about the current move by the US administration separating children from their parents who are seeking asylum. Despite many smokescreens and accusations that this policy has been around under previous administrations, that is simply a myth. The policy was introduced on 6th April 2018 and was the brainchild of John Kelly and Stephen Miller and approved by President Trump to serve as a deterrent for undocumented immigration. Read More

Vikram Seth, Life, Love and Writer’s Block

By | Authors | No Comments
Vikram Seth is an Indian novelist, poet and travel writer and one of the best known English language Indian writers of our time. Best known for his epic novel A Suitable Boy, Seth has been writing for three decades, although notably and famously suffered from writer’s block in recent times.

Born in Calcutta (now Kolkata) on 20th June 1952 Seth studied in India, moving to England to complete his A-levels at Tonbridge School. From here Seth headed to Oxford where he obtained a degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics.
Read More

In 1938, Tolkien Tried to Get the Hobbit Published in Germany, He Was Asked If He Had Jewish Ancestry, Here Is His Reply

By | Authors, Political | No Comments
In 1938, only a year or so before the start of the Second World War, J.R.R. Tolkien was busy trying to get The Hobbit published overseas. Tolkien’s publisher was working on bringing the novel to Germany where, under Adolf Hitler, anti-Semitism was rife. Before The Hobbit would be published, Tolkien was asked whether he was of Aryan origin, and by extension whether he was Jewish or had Jewish ancestry. Tolkien replied thusly:
Read More

Charles Dickens’ Contribution to Science to Feature in Exhibition

By | Authors, Culture, Literary Events, Literary Places, News | No Comments
Charles Dickens: Man of Science is a current exhibition running at the Charles Dickens Museum until November 11th and the exhibition is looking at the author’s contribution to science, and notably medicine.

Dickens astute observations on human behaviours means he spotted many illnesses and their symptoms before they were recognised by the medical community and his descriptions so accurate that they can be used to build correlation between symptoms and disease.
Read More

Some Surprising Facts about J.M Barrie’s Peter Pan

By | Authors, Children's Literature | No Comments
J. M Barrie (9th May 1860 – 19th June 1937) was a Scottish novelist and playwright, best remembered today as the writer who brought us Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up.

After being born and educated in Scotland, Barrie moved to London where he wrote more plays and novels. It was here he met the Llewelyn Davies boys who inspired him to write about a baby boy who has magical adventures in Kensington Gardens (The Little White Bird), and to write Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, a fairy play about an ageless boy and an ordinary girl named Wendy. Read More

Mary Shelley to Be the Focus of ‘Genius’ Season 3

By | Authors, News, Television | No Comments
In 2017, National Geographic launched a new TV series called Genius, which explores the lives of famed historical figures one might well label a genius. The first season followed Albert Einstein, the second Pablo Picasso, and it has now been confirmed that a third season is in the works and will follow the gothic writer Mary Shelley.

“Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein left an indelible mark on generations of imaginations,” said Carolyn Bernstein, EVP, global development and production for National Geographic Global Networks. “Equally inspiring is the story of Shelley’s relentless innovation, coupled with her desire to live on her own unconventional terms despite immense societal and cultural obstacles.” Read More

Leave a Reply