Mary Anning and the History of a Tongue Twister

By June 13, 2017Culture

Tongue Twisters are great, such fun as you try to bend your tongue around difficult rhymes and verses. Possibly one of the most famous tongue twisters of all time is about a woman who sells sea shells and it’s likely you’ve heard it, but you might not know that the ‘She’ in the tongue twister was a real woman, and she changed the face of science forever!

The original rhyme was written in 1908 by Terry Sullivan and it goes like this (do it out loud for extra fun!):

She sells seashells on the seashore
The shells she sells are seashells, I’m sure
So if she sells seashells on the seashore
Then I’m sure she sells seashore shells.

The original ‘she’ was in fact a real person, Mary Anning who was born on 21st May 1799 in Lyme Regis in Dorset, a place now known as the Jurassic Coast for its abundance of fossils. Anning was the first of 10 children who would grow up in abject poverty and received scant education.

During this time it was popular to collect shells and fossils and wealthy families would display these in cases in their homes, often brought from abroad. Known for its unusual fossils, Lyme Regis was a popular place to collect these curios and Anning’s family regularly collected fossils from the beach to make more money for the family.

To put the events into perspective, it would take until 1809 before Darwin joined our mortal coil and quite a bit longer before he started working on evolutionary theories, so these curios were just that, curious items with little understanding.

By the last 1820s, Anning had quite the reputation for fossil hunter. In 1823 she found her first complete Plesiosaurus and in 1828 her ptesosaurs, the first discovered flying dinosaur was displayed at the British museum. At this stage, Anning was in her 20s and was building fair knowledge in the items she was retrieving from the coast. Her knowledge on the genus of each skeleton she discovered was unparalleled and aged 27 had accrued enough knowledge and money to open a glass fronted shop, Anning’s Fossil Depot.

As a working class woman, Anning was considered to be an outsider in the scientific community, born in a time when women could not vote, hold office, and rarely worked in the science field, the credit for much of her knowledge and many of her accomplishments were taken by scientists, but there’s no denying with what we know today that Mary Anning was one of the foremothers of palaeontology and is credited with discovering the first Ichthyosaur, Plesiosaurus, fossil fish, pterosaur, and many invertebrates and trace fossils.

So the next time you hear ‘She sells seashells on the seashore’, remember that ‘she’ was quite a mighty woman who moved the scientific look at fossils along in leaps and bounds. Oh, and she was a religious dissenter!

If you’d like to know more about Mary Anning, we have some recommended reads for all ages below.

10 Literary Pet Peeves

By | Authors, Literature | No Comments
BBC Radio 4’s Open Book asked their listeners for their ‘literary pet peeves’. What really annoys you when you read a book? For me, it has to be lazy or dull writing and overuse of similes and metaphors.

Open Book’s guests on the 20th of June 2017 were literary critic Peter Kemp and historical crime novelist Antonia Hodgson. They were asked about the literary devices that make their cringe glands flare up. Their answers included stories told through a foggy memory, or animal narrators.

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Word of the Day – Chimaera

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Chimaera (noun) (also Chimera)

kai-mee-ra

(in Greek mythology) a fire-breathing female monster with a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a serpent’s tail. (modern biology) An organism containing a mixture of genetically different tissues, formed by processes such as fusion of early embryos, grafting, or mutation.

Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek khimaira ‘she-goat or chimaera’.

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By | New Releases, News | No Comments
John Green is one of the best known YA authors of our time and is responsible for tearjerkers such as Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, breaking the hearts of an entire generation. However, it’s been a while since we had a full length novel, the last The Fault in Our Stars was out in 2012, five years ago!

All that changed this week with the news that there’s a brand new full length novel coming from John Green this October, his first for five years! Turtles All the Way Down will be out on October 10th of this year and although there’s not yet a cover reveal, it is available for pre-order now. Read More

4 Bookish Kickstarter Campaigns to Get Excited About!

By | Literature, New Releases | No Comments
Kickstarter is a crowdfunding corporation founded in 2009 by Perry Chen, Yancey Strickler, and Charles Adler. The company is based in Brooklyn, New York, and is focussed on creative projects such as films, comics, journalism, literature, and video games.

It has kickstarted (oh! I see where they got the name from now!) many excellent projects you may have heard of, and a few you may not have. We have gathered a handful of the best literature-based projects out now, or made possible, thanks to Kickstarter. Just click on the heading of each campaign to take you to the corresponding Kickstarter page, or find the Amazon links below each book.

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Emma Watson Hiding More Books, Paris This Time

By | Literary Events, News | No Comments
Last November, Harry Potter actress Emma Watson joined the Books on the Underground movement, leaving feminist books on London Underground trains and stations, and now she’s back to her novel hiding ways, this time in Paris.

Watson played book loving Hermione Granger and has continued to carry the torch for book lovers ever since. Her feminist book club Our Shelf Shelf is turning out to be a global phenomenon, and with her Book Fairies initiative and the Books on the Underground movement, she making quite an impact on book lovers. Read More



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