Neil Gaiman to Adapt Pratchett’s Good Omens for TV

After insisting he would never adapt the book he co-authored with sir Terry Pratchett Neil Gaiman was finally been convinced to write the screenplay for Good Omens in spring of last year and the person who convinced him? None other than his co-author Sir Terry Pratchett.

Apparently Gaiman only changed his mind about adapting the 1990 novel after reading a letter which Pratchett had sent to him intending for it to be read only after the Discworld creator’s death.

While at a memorial event for Pratchett at the Barbican in London in April of last year Gaiman recalled Pratchett’s longtime friend and assistant Rob Wilkins recalled asking him if he would adapt Good Omens as they were driving back from Pratchett’s house after meeting up with the ailing author for what would be one of the final times. Wilkins said he approached Gaiman because in his words “it required love, it required patience” to adapt such an iconic piece of literature but was rebuffed. Gaiman admits he was horrified at the thought “Absolutely not,” he remembers telling Wilkins “Terry and I had a deal that we would only work on Good Omens things together,” he explained. “Everything that was ever written – bookmarks and tiny little things – we would always collaborate, everything was a collaboration. So, obviously, no.”

But Terry Pratchett in typical Pratchett style had other ideas and requested that the author write an adaptation by himself, with his blessing. “At that point, I think I said, ‘You bastard, yes,’” remembers Gaiman and so began the adaptation of the story of Crowley the demon and Aziraphale the angel teaming up to deal with the (schoolboy) Antichrist into a six-part television series.
All has been quiet for the last few months until Gaiman Tweeted this little teaser:

Never has a thirty-year wait gone by so quickly nor taken so long.

Monopoly to Release Winchester Version to Celebrate Austen Anniversary

By | Authors, Inspired by Literature, Literary Events, News | No Comments
This year Winchester is celebrating Jane Austen, on the 200th anniversary of the author’s death, and today it’s been announced that there is to be a Winchester Monopoly, created to mark Austen 200.

Winchester is the final resting place of novelist Jane Austen who died in the city in 1817, aged just 41, an event that will be marked this year in a series of events in the city and around the world. Read More

10 Comical Tweets About Classic Literature

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Sometimes Twitter provides the best means for procrastination and is often a rich treasure trove of hilarity. This is one of those times. So you don’t have to trawl through a bunch of boring tweets about what someone is having for their lunch just to get a giggle out of a pun further down, we have collected 10 of the funniest literary quips there.

Readers can be some of the funniest, punniest, most comical tweeters around, just take a look…

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8 Fictional Literary Destinations You Can Visit in Real Life

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We get lost among the pages of our favourite novels, happily so, and those fictional worlds become our own. However, many of us still dream of visiting the imaginary places in our favourite novels, and while we can’t walk the halls of Hogwarts, or visit Middle Earth, we can look at places that inspired our favourite books, or the filming locations of adaptations for some inspiration for a literary holiday!

Today we have ten fictional destinations that you can – kind of – visit in real life, bringing your fictional worlds to life. Read More

Plan The Perfect Beatrix Potter Party

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The world of Beatrix Potter has been around since the early 1900s, and has grown in popularity over the years that followed. Her anthropomorphised animal characters are well-loved by children all over the world, from the naughty little Peter Rabbit to the unfortunate Jemima Puddle-Duck. Potter’s continuing favour among families can be seen in the extensive range of merchandise depicting Peter and Friends, including toys, tea sets, and clothing.

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Literary Inspired Art of Jorge Mendez Blake

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Jorge Mendez Blake has created an art installation “The Castle”, inspired by literature.

By using a lone Kafka novel, El Castillo, Blake has shown the physical representation of the impact one book can make.

Franz Kafka’s book lies at the bottom of a brick wall causing a slight but increasingly noticeable change in the wall’s structure. It is one of those ideas we all think, ‘Why didn’t I think of that?!’

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