10 Words That Have Crossed the Atlantic

By March 14, 2017Culture, Language

Linguistics expert and fellow reader, Dr Lynne Murphy, regularly blogs about her observations of the ever-adapting English language through her online alter-ego Lynneguistic (I know, haha!)

She recently caught our attention on BBC Radio 4’s Word of Mouth with Michael Rosen with their discussion on how US and UK words are being shared, loved, and hated on either side of the pond.

Many people in the UK use the word ‘awesome’, for example, and possibly the same amount cannot stand the hyperbolic use of the word. In the USA the phrase ‘baby bump’ is causing many grimaces as well as many giggles, while UK swear/curse words such as ‘wanker’ are breaking through thanks to social media, film and television.




Inspired by Lynne’s work, and the fascinating program on BBC Radio 4, we have compiled a list of the most recent words to cross in either direction between the UK and the US.

US To UK



UK To US

For an in-depth analysis of these words and phrases, head over to Lynnegusitic’s blog where she explains further what, why and how these words are used, and shared between us.

Lynne’s work is also available on Amazon for those who geek over language:

Semantic Relations and the Lexicon: Antonymy, Synonymy and other Paradigms US

Semantic Relations and the Lexicon: Antonymy, Synonymy and other Paradigms UK




We Only Speak TXTSLNG

By | Language | No Comments

Yo. il meet u 2moro n den we cn dcyd wats 2 b done 4 Claire’s bday. Pls ask Anne 2 join us 2. Oh n I saw d vid u sent. Lol. So kul! Anyway, cu 2moro. Lmk d tym. Gtg.

If you were able to read and understand that entire message perfectly, you officially speak texting lingo.

Standard SMS messages originally had a limit of 160 characters and, indeed, many still do. Read More

Reading the Signs: Sign Language

By | Culture, Language | No Comments
Various languages have, since time immemorial, been the mode of communication between people. These languages have evolved over time and today we see a large language map which has many language families and dialects. These are mostly verbal and written. But what about a large part of world population that is hard of hearing or has hearing and speaking disabilities?

Sign language is a visual means of communication that uses hand gestures and facial expressions. It is mainly used by people who have hearing or speech impairments. Read More

Words

Play On Words, or With Them

By | Language | No Comments
Word Play is verbal wit- the manipulation of language with the intent to amuse. Sounds and meanings of words are exploited resulting in funny remarks. It has a wider use orally than in written text but literature has always been full of word play.

Examples of this literary technique include puns, double entendres, tongue twisters, etc. We often engage in wordplay such as jokes and witty remarks during casual conversations among friends and colleagues. Read More

Decoding English Proficiency Tests

By | Language | No Comments
Most of us have gone through the long and cumbersome process of filling applications, submitting resumes, writing SOPs and taking English Proficiency Tests when applying to universities. For those of us, who may not have had English as a medium of study or those who do not belong to countries where English is the first or second language, it is required that we take certain exams to prove our English fluency when we wish to study in certain universities. These institutions ask for our test scores to make sure we will be able to handle the medium of instruction and therefore, be able to study and perform well. Although various language proficiency tests exist to gauge performance ability in many languages across the world, let us take a look at the various English proficiency tests. Read More

5 Books for Language Lovers

By | Language, Literature | No Comments
Following on from 21 Words for Book Lovers, we have played the old switcheroo and found 5 books you word lovers will adore…

For many human beings words form part of our communication, and without them many of us would be lost. Language fascinates, frustrates, and entices us. As Reading Addicts it is part of our daily ritual to fall head first into pages upon pages of the written word and get lost in there for hours.

We often find ourselves re-reading an elegantly constructed sentence just to feel it trip through the mind a few more times. Other times our knowledge fails us and we reach for a dictionary, feeling that small thrill of learning a new piece of lexiconic excellence.

Your fellow language lovers at For Reading Addicts have collated a list of language-orientated books we think you may find useful or enjoyable as you continue your quest of expanding your mind through literature.

Please peruse and enjoy!

Read More

Bees Don’t Spell: The Origins of the Spelling Bee

By | Language | No Comments
At one point or another during our schooling years, we have all been part of Spelling competitions held in class or at an inter-school level. These are often known as Spelling Bee contests though heaven knows what bees have to do with spelling words like we do!

A Spelling bee is a competition in which contestants are asked to spell a broad selection of words, usually with a varying degree of difficulty. The concept is thought to have originated in the United States and spelling bee events are now held in many other countries around the world. Read More

21 Words Book Lovers Will Appreciate

By | Language, On Writing | No Comments
As we suspect you rather like reading, and you possibly enjoy a decent word now and again, we have collated some fun and interesting words for your perusal. You may notice they are not all to an OED standard, in fact a few may not even be English at all, but they are nonetheless fairly exciting and ultimately satisfying to any book lover.

Take a look at our slideshow of some bookish words to tickle your fancy…

Read More

The Grammar Vigilante of Bristol

By | Language, Video | No Comments
I love being British. The big story here today is about a grammar vigilante who has been going around his home city of Bristol for the last thirteen years correcting shop signs around the city. The secret corrector has been at it for a while, but the BBC have tracked him down and found how hard he works for proper grammar.

The mission to correct the city’s grammar is one he takes very seriously, taking his home made ‘apostrophiser’ around the city to correct signs. He works hard not to be a vandal, repairing each sign perfectly, matching up colours and using sticky apostrophes rather than permanently defacing signs. Read More

Leave a Reply