10 Words That Have Crossed the Atlantic

By March 14, 2017Culture, Language

Linguistics expert and fellow reader, Dr Lynne Murphy, regularly blogs about her observations of the ever-adapting English language through her online alter-ego Lynneguistic (I know, haha!)

She recently caught our attention on BBC Radio 4’s Word of Mouth with Michael Rosen with their discussion on how US and UK words are being shared, loved, and hated on either side of the pond.

Many people in the UK use the word ‘awesome’, for example, and possibly the same amount cannot stand the hyperbolic use of the word. In the USA the phrase ‘baby bump’ is causing many grimaces as well as many giggles, while UK swear/curse words such as ‘wanker’ are breaking through thanks to social media, film and television.

Inspired by Lynne’s work, and the fascinating program on BBC Radio 4, we have compiled a list of the most recent words to cross in either direction between the UK and the US.



For an in-depth analysis of these words and phrases, head over to Lynnegusitic’s blog where she explains further what, why and how these words are used, and shared between us.

Lynne’s work is also available on Amazon for those who geek over language:

Semantic Relations and the Lexicon: Antonymy, Synonymy and other Paradigms US

Semantic Relations and the Lexicon: Antonymy, Synonymy and other Paradigms UK

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