Rowling Receives Honour from the Queen for Services to Literature

2017 has been quite the year for J. K Rowling, in a writing career that in twenty years shows no signs of slowing down. This year has seen the Fantastic Beasts franchise explode, so much so that we’re still waiting for Lethal White, the latest in the Cormoran Strike series from her Robert Galbraith pseudonym. Now Rowling has been honoured at Buckingham Palace for services to literature too in a rare accolade that is surely the cherry on the pie for the much-loved author.

This week, on December 12th at a ceremony at Buckingham Palace, J. K Rowling was given a Companion of Honour accolade and medal, a rare title that can only be held by sixty-five people at any given time. The honour recognises “services of national importance” and was awarded to Rowling for her services to literature and philanthropy (fans of the author will be aware she was removed from The Times rich list for giving away most of her money).

The Companion of Honour was established in 1917 at the same time as the Order of the British Empire by King George V and is given out to worthy recipients across the Commonwealth realms. It’s a rare accolade, originally the order was restricted to just fifty members, in 1943 that was enlarged to 65.

There are currently sixty-two companions, including Rowling, plus three honorary companions. Other well known names on the list include Stephen Hawking, Lord Tebbit, Sir David Attenborough, David Hockney, Dame Judi Dench, and Sir Roger Bannister, to name but a few, putting Rowling in pretty good company!

Hopefully now her wonderful and whirlwind year is over, Jo can get back to finishing Lethal White (PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE!)

Man Booker to Accept Irish Submissions for the First Time

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2018 is going to be an exciting year for the Man Booker as the prize celebrates it’s fiftieth year with a raft of celebrations and awards. And for Irish publishers, it’ll be an extra special year as for the first time author’s from the country will be able to submit books for consideration.

The move is likely to curb a lot of frustration felt by Irish publishers about the situation, especially as there’s never been any good reason for the exclusion. The entire situation is caused by an anomaly, simply because Irish books aren’t published in the UK, but that has now been rectified. Read More

Rowling Receives Honour from the Queen for Services to Literature

By | Authors, Children's Literature, Literary Awards, News | No Comments
2017 has been quite the year for J. K Rowling, in a writing career that in twenty years shows no signs of slowing down. This year has seen the Fantastic Beasts franchise explode, so much so that we’re still waiting for Lethal White, the latest in the Cormoran Strike series from her Robert Galbraith pseudonym. Now Rowling has been honoured at Buckingham Palace for services to literature too in a rare accolade that is surely the cherry on the pie for the much-loved author. Read More

Blackwell’s Names its Book of the Year 2017

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It’s that time of year when we reflect over the past year in literature to see what the real stand out releases of the year were. This week Blackwell’s Bookshops announced their book of the year for 2017 and it’s a book that started life as a lowly crowdfunder campaign.

Blackwell’s Book of the Year 2017 is Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, a book that has really captured the zeitgeist of the women’s movement in 2017. Read More

Christopher Bollen Wins the Bad Sex in Fiction Award 2017

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The Bad Sex in Fiction Award is organised by the Literary Review and was established in 1993 by journalist and writer Auberon Waugh. The prize exists to draw attention to poorly written, perfunctory or redundant passages of sexual description in modern fiction. Because of the ‘redundant’ part of the prize, the Bad Sex in Fiction award does not cover pornographic or expressly erotic literature. Read More



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