Read Your Way Around the Muslim Ban Countries

PotUS 45’s current travel restrictions, dubbed the ‘Muslim travel ban’ have been little out of the news all week as restrictions are put on all travellers, as opposed to those involved in criminality. If you’re outraged by this movement that has left both foreign travellers and Green Card holders stranded, then you may be looking to show some support, and as always we’re doing that in a bookish way, recommending authors from the Muslim ban countries.

We can’t change the world, but we can expand our perception of it, and so today we’re recommending a book from one author from each of the countries affected and it makes for an excellent reading list!

Iran

Persepolis – Marjane Satrapi

Persepolis is a graphic autobiography by Marjane Satrapi depicting her childhood up to her early adult years in Iran during and after the Islamic revolution. The title is a reference to the ancient capital of the Persian Empire, Persepolis. Originally published in French, it has been translated into several languages including English.

Persepolis US
Persepolis UK

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Marjane Satrapi was born in Rasht, Iran, and grew up in Tehran in a middle-class Iranian family. Today the author lives in France and has dual nationality to the two countries.

Iraq

A Sky So Close – Betool Khedairi

This stunning debut novel from Betool Khedairi centres around a young girl, coming of age. Born to an Iraqi father and English mother, the narrator struggles with themes that are universal.

A Sky So Close US
A Sky So Close UK

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Betool Khedairi was born in Baghdad, Iraq in 1965 to an Iraqi father and Scottish mother. Today she lives in Amman, Jordan.

Libya

Gold Dust – Ibrahim al Koni

Gold Dust is a classic story of the brotherhood between man and beast, the thread of companionship that is all the difference between life and death in the desert. It is a story of the fight to endure in a world of limitless and waterless wastes, and a parable of the struggle to survive in the most dangerous landscape of all: human society.

Gold Dust US
Gold Dust UK

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Ibrahim al-Koni was born in Libya in 1948. A Tuareg who writes in Arabic, he spent his childhood in the desert and learned to read and write Arabic when he was twelve.

Somalia

Maps – Naruddin Farah

“Maps” is the first novel in his acclaimed Blood in the Sun trilogy, set in his native land. Askar lost his father in the bloody war between Ethiopia and Somalia, and his mother died giving birth to him. Taken in by Misra, a kindhearted woman, he grows up in a small village. But as an adolescent, a true child of his times, he begins to feel suffocated there and goes to live with his cosmopolitan aunt and uncle in the capital.

Maps US
Maps UK

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Nuruddin Farah was born in 1945 in Baidoa, Somalia. He is the author of numerous novels, novellas, short stories, and plays. His novels have been translated into many languages and have won numerous international awards. He now divides his time between Cape Town, South Africa and Annandale, New York.



Sudan

The Kindness of Enemies – Leila Aboulela

The Kindness of Enemies is told from the perspective of Natasha Wilson, who knows how difficult it is to fit in. Born to a Russian mother and a Muslim father, she feels adrift in Scotland and longs for a place which really feels like home.

The Kindness of Enemies US
The Kindness of Enemies UK

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Leila Aboulela is the author of many novels and has collected many literary accolades, she grew up in Khartoum, Sudan and now lives in Aberdeen.

Syria

Syrian Stories – Gladys Matar

“Syrian Stories” is a compilation of intriguing short stories that tell about what is going on in the author’s society. It is not about the war in Syria, rather about the people who find themselves trapped in pain and joy together.

Syrian Stories US
Syrian Stories UK

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Born to Wade Matar, a pioneering architect and Leila Richo, an artistic home maker, Gladys Matar grew up in Latakia, the city with the distinction of being the most important port of Syria.

Yemen

A Land Without Jasmine – Wajdi al-Adhal

A Land without Jasmine is a sexy, satirical detective story about the sudden disappearance of a young female student from Yemen’s Sanaa University. Each chapter is narrated by a different character beginning with Jasmine herself.

A Land Without Jasmine US
A Land Without Jasmine UK

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Wajdi al-Ahdal is a Yemeni novelist, short story writer and playwright. He was born near Bajil in the province of Al Hudaydah and studied at the University of Sanaa.

With special thanks to reading addict June Senghi who helped compile this list.

6 Jack the Ripper Books to Give You the Chills

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On 31st August 1888, the body of Mary Ann Nichols was found in London, sparking a reign of terror so terrible the story would live in through the centuries. Mary Ann Nichols is thought to have been the first victim of the serial killer who would be known as Jack the Ripper. T

The Ripper was never caught and it’s maybe this that ensures his place as one of the most infamous serial killers in history. The stories and theories over the years have kept armchair detectives riveted and many, many books have been written about the subject. Read More

7 New Twisty Turny Thrillers That Could be This Year’s Gone Girl

By | Literature, New Releases, Polls and Discussion | No Comments
We all love a good thriller, and the genre has never been so popular. After Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl rewrote the genre we’ve seen so many exciting thrillers, often with strong female characters, all designed to make you change your loyalties from page to page, and that trend is continuing with some fantastic books released this year, filling the void perfectly.

There are hundreds of new thrillers out this year, but for this post we’re specifically featuring books that we think could be this year’s “Gone Girl”, the thriller that kept us all on a roller coaster ride before being made into a major movie. Read More

Penguin Random House Shows Pride with LGBTQ Reading List

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Publishers Penguin Random House has taken to the streets of central London this week to march in support of Pride, an annual event marking the decriminalisation of homosexuality in the UK.

This year was the year’s fiftieth anniversary and Penguin Random House UK was in partnership with Stonewall to celebrate the importance of representation of LGBTQ people in literature and the progressions of LGBT equality through literature. Read More

Hit of the Lits: FRA Top 40 – June

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Hit of the Lits – FRA Top 40

We’ve been running our monthly reader chart here at For Reading Addicts for almost two years and over that time it’s been one of our most popular features. However, in recent months interest in the chart has declined so it’s with regret that we announce that this will be our final monthly Hit of the Lits. We will return with a new format and a new idea at the end of the summer, so if you love this feature then don’t worry too much!

That aside, it’s time for our final Hit of the Lits monthly chart where we share what you’ve loved over the past month with other readers. Thanks to all who joined in and voting for their June favourites, here’s the top 40!

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The 10 Coolest Books on African Culture

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African culture is very diverse, beautiful, and it can be shocking sometimes. African ethnicity is extremely complicated. According to rough estimates, the continent has about 50 nations and nationalities, and 3 thousand different tribes speaking a thousand languages.

There are so many interesting books by African writers. If you are interested in African culture, here is a top 10 best novels about Africa. Read More



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