See How a Japanese Craftsman Restores a Battered Old Book

By January 11, 2018Literature

No doubt many of you have a treasured book that you’ve read countless times, but numerous re-reads can take their toll, especially on old books. Those of you beginning to worry about the battered spine and dog-eared pages of your favourite novel will be interested to see this skilled Japanese craftsman restore a seriously tattered 1000 page dictionary back to its former glory.

As MyModernMet reports, an episode of a show called Shuri, Bakaseru (translation: The Fascinating Craftsman) featured a very talented artisan named Nobuo Okano, who specializes in restoring old books. In just a 10 minute segment, he showed how he restored the old English-to-Japanese dictionary. The dictionary belonged to his customer as a student and, now the customer’s daughter is beginning college, he wanted to have it restored so he can pass it on to her.

Firstly, Okano begins by cleaning the old glue from the book’s spine and then repairs damaged pages, including the maps. They’re glued onto new paper and thus given a solid base. The most tedious part of the restoration sees Okano unfold the book’s bent page corners with tweezers, he then iron each one out. To freshen up the tips of the pages that are stained by ink, Okano uses a guillotine book cutter to trim the pages and remove the stains.

The last step is creating a new cover for the book. Okano uses the salvaged title from the original cover and puts it onto the new one. The dictionary now looks as good as new and is ready to be returned to his grateful, and no doubt very impressed, customer.

Women’s Prize For Fiction Shortlist Has Been Announced

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On International Women’s Day 2018, the longlist for the Women’s Prize for Fiction was announced. Those 16 books were read and discussed by the panel of judges- Sarah Sands, Katy Brand, Anita Anand, Catherine Mayer, and Imogen Stubbs- and whittled down to a final sensational 6.

The process is tough as there is so much wonderful talent to choose from, but after heated debates and heartfelt advocacies for favourite novels the shortlist has been decided upon.

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Last Year, Teenage Vandals Were Sentenced to Reading Books. Here’s What One Learned

By | Literature, News, Political | No Comments
Last year, we reported the news that five teenage vandals, who defaced an historic black schoolhouse with the phrases “white power”, “black power”, and swastikas, were sentenced by Judge Avelina Jacob to read books that would make them realise the error of their ways and then write reports on them. The children were given a list of relevant books and had to select a few each. The books covered some of the most divisive periods of history and included topics such as the Holocaust and slavery in the US.

A year has gone by since the sentence was passed and the teenagers have read their books and handed in their reports. Alejandra Rueda, a deputy commonwealth attorney who suggested the sentence, said “I hope that they learned the lesson that I hoped that they would learn, which was tolerance.” So have they?
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Kindle Storyteller Award Back for Second Year

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Last year Kindle announced its first ever Storyteller Award for authors who publish their work through Kindle Direct Publishing in the UK. Last year the thriller, The Relic Hunters won the first ever award and now it’s announced that the award is back for a second year.

On 10th April Amazon UK opened this year’s awards, a literary prize recognising outstanding work by self published authors. To qualify for the 2018 award you must have published your book via Kindle Direct Publishing, between 1st May 2018 and 31st August 2018. Read More

Private Lives of Authors: Hans Christian Andersen

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Hans Christian Andersen lead a life almost as full of intrigue and romance as his fairy tales. In perhaps unsurprising comparisons to Andersen’s The Little Mermaid, Doctor Alfred Charles Kinsey of the Institute for Sex Research noted:

“Andersen could not tell the world of his own homosexual love for the people of the world, but the original manuscripts showed his feelings clearly.”

 

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New Twitter game hilariously shames bad male authors

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A new Twitter game has taken the internet by storm!

Many women have noticed how female characters can be so badly written, especially by men. It is almost as if those male writers don’t see women as people, with complex personalities and 3-dimensional lives. The strange and often nonsensical over-description of women’s bodies  can be most irritating, and when a male writer has a female character narrating, it often becomes embarrassing for everyone involved.

Writer Gwen C. Katz noticed this happening again and again until one day, when faced with yet another ridiculous passage in a book she had begun reading, she tweeted a snippet from the book.

The discussion that followed prompted her fellow women readers and writers on Twitter to join in a game… Describe yourself as a male writer would. 

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