The Final Days of Children’s Author Helen Bailey

By January 10, 2017News

In April of last year we shared the shocking news of the disappearance of children’s author Helen Bailey who went missing from her Royston home on the 11th of April 2016 along with her beloved Dachshund Boris.

After weeks with no sign of her and no activity on her social media accounts or her phone or bank Helen’s remains were found in the septic tank under her home alongside the body of her little dog, and her fiancé Ian Stewart immediately came under suspicion of causing the writer’s death and was subsequently arrested and charged with Helen’s murder.

During his trial it has been revealed that Helen’s final days were spent in a drug induced stupor as her fiancé cold bloodedly administered sleeping medication that he had been prescribed before suffocating her and dumping her body in the family home’s septic tank and in opening the trial at St Albans Crown Court, prosecutor Stuart Trimmer QC said: “The crown say this was simply a long-planned, deliberate killing, a cynically executed murder that had money as its driving motive.”

The prosecution state that the motive for Helen’s murder was simply for financial gain, Ian stood to gain a huge amount from the author who was worth an estimated £4 million at the time of her death as he stood to gain both the house and a substantial amount of money should Helen die prior to their marriage.
To add credence to the tale that Helen had simply disappeared it is claimed that Stewart also killed her Dachshund Boris as it was well known that she adored the little dog and would never leave him behind.

Prior to her disappearance Helen had complained of feeling unusually tired with her internet history showing she had made a series of web searches which included:
“Why do I keep falling asleep?
“Can’t stop falling asleep
“I’m so tired.
“Falling asleep at work.

Prosecutors claim that it was because Stewart had been secretly administering Zopiclone which he had been prescribed for insomnia, traces of which were found in Helen’s body and it is claimed that once she was unconscious that Stewart suffocated her with a duvet that he was seen on CCTV dumping at a local recycling centre.

Helen was best known for her children’s books about Electra Brown and Daisy Davenport, but found a new audience with her blog, Planet Grief, about becoming a widow.
The case continues.

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