Royal British Legion Install “In Flanders Fields” Poem Across the Land

By November 12, 2017News, Poetry

Today is Remembrance Sunday in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth of Nations, put aside as a day to commemorate the British and Commonwealth military and civilian servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts. The day is always marked on the second Sunday in November, the Sunday nearest to 11th November, Armistice Day.

Every year the Royal British Legion put on displays across the land, usually incorporating the red poppy, the symbol of Remembrance and this year that display includes a very famous poem.

Across the land the Royal British Legion is installing lines of In Flanders Fields, an iconic First World War poem written by Canadian Physician Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae. The display is stunning, take a look:

Here’s the poem in its entirety:

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

A Wrinkle in Time: Release Date and New Trailer

By | Adaptations, News, Video | No Comments
A few months ago Disney announced that they’d be adapting the classic sci-fi A Wrinkle in Time and released a small first trailer to give a taste of what was to come. All we knew at that point was that the film was marked for a spring 2018 release but this week, Disney have released a first trailer for the movie, and we have a release date too!

If you are beyond excited, and don’t have the advantage of being able to create A Wrinkle in Time then you’ll have to wait a little while yet, March 9th is the release date for cinemas. Read More

First Look at Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

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As someone who has spend her Harry Potterdom wishing she could find out more about young Dumbledore and his relationship with Grindelwald, I couldn’t be more excited about the next installation in the Fantastic Beasts franchise!

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald isn’t expected for release until 2018, but the first teaser is out today! We can expect a screenplay in book format to follow soon after, as happened with the first film, and while I’m sad at the switch from book to movie, it won’t stop me watching this! Read More

5 Of Our Favourite Button Poetry Performances

By | Poetry, Video | No Comments
I first came across Button Poetry on Facebook. with almost 1.5 million followers on that social media platform alone they are proving to have worldwide appeal.

Based in Minnesota, the Button Poetry organisation is dedicated to bringing us performance poetry from a host of talented poets. Some of the poets tug at your heart, while others make you laugh at their clever commentary and witty prose. Even if you are not a fan of poetry, performance poetry is more accessible, inclusive, and exciting than you would imagine.

We have picked out 5 of our favourites- a tiny fraction of what is on offer- and implore you to check out some more on their YouTube channel, or via Facebook.

Content warning: Strong language and intense themes.

Read More

Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen (Read by Christopher Eccleston)

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Wilfred Edward Salter Owen (18th March 1893 – 4th November 1918) was an English poet and soldier and one of the most well known poets of the First World War. He spoke of the horrors of trenches and gas warfare, bringing his experiences to life, in stark contrast to the popular propaganda of the ‘Glorious War’ spreading around at the time.

Owen was killed in action on 4th November 1918 during the crossing of the Sambre-Oise Canal exactly one week (almost to the hour) before the signing of the Armistice which ended the war. Because of his death, much of his work was published posthumously. Read More

Philip K. Dick: From Book to Film – A Video Essay

By | Authors, Video | No Comments
Philip K. Dick December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982 was an American writer notable for his works of science fiction where his writing is dominated by authoritarian themes, alternate universes and altered states of consciousness, many of which have been adapted for film and television.

His work has spanned many decades, and you can often age people by what they know him for. In the early 80s when the movie adaptation was released, we all passed around copies of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, today The Man in the High Castle is big news thanks to Amazon. Read More



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