Lyrically Justified- the UK showcases its brightest new stars of the poetry world

By March 13, 2018 New Releases, Poetry

The initial inspiration for Lyrically Justified (Volumes 1 & 2) came when two open mic promoters, Saiqa Rehman and Harry Lotta, felt the poets who spoke at their sessions deserved promoting.

Their website explains the influences behind their anthologies:

“The Urban Word Collective was born out of a dream of a shared space whereby Urban Poets could mutually promote, celebrate and inspire one another for the benefit of their communities and ultimately country. Such poets are the Bob Dylans of today and have so much to say, to add to navigating a tumultuous world. ​The world of poetry has never been exclusive to one tradition, rather a tree with roots that propagates, seeding for the present and future.”

 




Poetry compiler Shaun Clarke speaks here:

Volume 1 of the Lyrically Justified anthology from Urban Collective was released in 2016, and Volume 2 has recently been produced thanks to a Crowdfunding project. The books proudly display the diversity of the UK and, through independent publishing, poets who may not have been so lucky otherwise have a chance of being heard.

Urban poetry tells us stories with passion in rhythm and an almost-magical way of making the reader want to read out loud. The poets in these anthologies are offering an insight into their lives, minds, loves, and fears. Despite having started out as spoken word poets, their work translates well to the page. As much as it would be wonderful to find yourself at an open mic night in Bristol, and hear the poets sing, speak, rhyme, and chant, reading their lyrical prose can still feel like an intimate experience.

The poets come from varied backgrounds, having lived different lives but coming together in a mutual passion for expression through language and creative thought.

Not satisfied with just helping poets across the country, Urban Collective are giving proceeds from the sale of the books towards grassroots charities – 5-10% of donations are offered to Freedom Project (Bristol) and Leeds Young Authors.

With thanks to Polly at Arkbound social enterprise publishers for sending For Reading Addicts a copy of Lyrically Justified Volume 2!  

Poets Read Poems About Climate Change on a Melting Glacier

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Climate change is causing Greenland’s glaciers to melt, and the pacific island nations are noticing the increased amount of water caused by erosion of these mighty glaciers. In an effort to try and raise awareness about the colossal threat global warming poses, two poets came together on a melting glacier to recite a poem they’d written together.

The two had never met before when Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner traveled from the Marshall Islands in Micronesia to Greenland’s capital city Nuuk where she met Inuk poet Aka Niviâna. They then met up with a small film crew and journeyed on to an isolated area on southern Greenland’s ice sheet where they recited their poem “Rise” atop a melting glacier.

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The Controversy of Ezra Pound

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There’s no denying that Ezra Pound (30th October 1885 – 1st November 1972) was one of the greatest poets of the 20th century. Born in Idaho territory in 1885, Pound was the only child of English expatriate parents, Pound went to a Quaker school and had his first poetry published at 11 years old.

Into adulthood, Pound was credited with being a leading figure in Imagism, a movement derived from classical Chinese poetry, stressing clarity, precision, and economy of language. He’s also credited with being a major figure in early modernist poetry.
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2018 National Book Awards Longlist: Poetry

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This week we’re bringing you the longlist via the New Yorker for the National Book Awards 2018. So far we’ve had fiction, young people’s literature, and translated literature but today we’re looking at the poetry nominations.

The longlist for poetry is an eclectic collection with a range of poetry styles and collections. Some we’ve heard of, some poets are new to us, but we do know that if it’s in the longlist then it’s almost guaranteed to be a fantastic collection.

And here it is, the National Book Awards Longlist for Poetry 2018:

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Literary Laugharne: From 1172 to Dylan Thomas

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Don’t tell everyone, but last week I sneaked off on a little holiday down the coast and while I was there I went to spend a day in Laugharne. The small town is best known for being home to Dylan Thomas but less well known is its connection to Richard Hughes (A High Wind in Jamaica).

Laugharne is steeped in history, and was well before Thomas decided to reside there. It has a castle that dates back to the 1100s, laid siege by Cromwell in the 1600s but still standing in ruinous form today. The town also contains many fine examples of Georgian townhouses and is home to the Laugharne Corporation, the last surviving medieval corporation in the UK.

It is however, best known for being the home of Dylan Thomas and the town is scattered with landmarks connected to the author, from the boathouse, to his writing shed, the castle gazebo where he and Richard Hughes wrote together, the Dylan Thomas birthday walk, inspired by Poem in October, and his final resting place.
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Ted Hughes: in his own words

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Ted Hughes was born in Yorkshire, England on the 17th of August, 1930 and grew up in and around farmland where he learned to fish and hunt. His poetry is steeped with natural imagery, flora and fauna. The savagery of the natural world- both beautiful and violent- influenced him greatly, prompting him to use animals and nature as metaphorical devices.

Hughes’ terse yet powerful use of language, coloured by his West Riding dialect, created a hard energy to his work- emphatic but evocative, and never self-indulgent.

Watch below for a wonderful reading of The Crow by the poet himself.

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The Night of the Murdered Poets

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It sounds like the plot to a fantastic movie doesn’t it? Sadly the truth is a stain on history and yet another blot that fascism has left on our past.

On 12th August 1952, the execution of thirteen Soviet Jews in the Lubyanka Prison in Moscow in the then Soviet Union was carried out, the charges? Counterrevolutionary crimes and organised action meant to topple, undermine, or weaken the Soviet Union, whatever that means. Read More

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