10 Children’s and Young Adult Books for Future Eco-Warriors

Climate change; plastic waste; the sixth mass extinction; right now, discussions about the future of our planet can be scary ground, and it’s really hard not to paint a bleak picture of the future! This can make talking to children about the planet very difficult, and while we want them to be clued up and conscientious, we don’t want to cause our children anxiety.

Eco-anxiety is really a thing now, a rational fear brought about by worry about the planet’s future, so if you’re looking to broach this subject with your children before the media does, here are some books to soften the blow and help to find the right way to talk to our children about the planet.

For Young Readers

The Earth Book – Todd Parr

If we want to get into good habits regarding the planet, it’s best to start early! And this simple to read book for very young children full of advice and guidance on how to go green and how that saves the world, such as “I turn off the taps when I brush my teeth because I like fish”.

Buy Now

Submit a Review

What a Waste – Jess French

It seems that one of the biggest threats to the planet right now is our own waste! We are literally drowning in plastic and it’s pretty scary. What a Waste looks at trash, recycling and protecting the planet, and it isn’t all doom and gloom, as the book tells how small changes can make a big impact!

Buy Now

Submit a Review

The Earth and I – Frank Asch

Modern life can give us a bit of a disconnect with nature, and children in particular can benefit from what the great outdoors has to offer. “The Earth and I are friends,” the book begins. “Sometimes we go for walks together. I tell her what’s on my mind. She listens to every word.” We’re reminded that although it seems like nature will always be there for us like a dear old friend, we cannot take it for granted.

Buy Now

Submit a Review

Compost Stew – Mary McKenna Sidals

Many of the books in this genre give an all round view of the planet and what we need to do, but others, such as Compost Stew, are designed to promote the habits that will help to save the planet, such as this children’s guide to composting!

Buy Now

Submit a Review

The Lorax – Dr Seuss

We couldn’t make a list of books that promote environmentalism without including The Lorax. The sad thing is, the Lorax was released in 1971 and it seems we still haven’t learned the lessons it has on offer.

Buy Now

Submit a Review



For Older Readers

The Lost Words – Robert McFarlane

Back in 2007, a new edition of the Oxford Children’s Dictionary was released, and in it, words such as acorn, adder, bluebell, dandelion, fern, heron, kingfisher, newt, otter, and willow were replaced with others, such as attachment, blog, broadband, bullet-point, cut-and-paste, and voice-mail. The news of these substitutions ― the outdoor and natural being displaced by the indoor and virtual ― became seen by many as a powerful sign of the growing gulf between childhood and the natural world. This book is designed to conjure back this special words from nature.

Buy Now

Submit a Review

Earth Heroes – Lily Dyer

It can be easy to feel like one person cannot make a difference when it comes to saving the world, but as Earth Heroes shows, many individuals have made a difference, and no change is too small!

Buy Now

Submit a Review

Storm in a Teacup – Helen Czerski

To understand nature and climate, we must understand physics, or at least the basics. Czerski provides the tools to alter the way we see everything around us by linking ordinary objects and occurrences, like popcorn popping, coffee stains, and fridge magnets, to big ideas like climate change, the energy crisis, or innovative medical testing.

Buy Now

Submit a Review

Generation Green – Linda Sivertsen

We know there’s an eco-crisis, but how do we solve it? Generation Green is packed with hints and tips and calls itself the ultimate teen guide to living an eco-friendly life.

Buy Now

Submit a Review

It’s Getting Hot in Here – Bridget Heos

Tackling the issue of global warming head-on for a teen audience, Bridget Heos examines the science behind it, the history of climate change on our planet, and the ways in which humans have affected the current crisis we face.

Buy Now

Read a Review

We hope you find some good suggestions there and we’ll be back with more recommendations lists soon. If you want to ensure you never miss any of these, subscribe now.



Leave your vote

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.