Word of the Day – Antipodes

By January 13, 2018Word of the Day

Antipodes (plural noun)

an-tip-o-deez

Diametrically opposite. Or if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere, Australia and it’s surrounding nations.

Late Middle English: via French or late Latin from Greek antipodes ‘having the feet opposite’, from anti ‘against, opposite’ + pous, pod- ‘foot’. The term originally denoted the inhabitants of opposite sides of the earth.

Example sentences

“Well they’re the antipodes of what we were looking for to be honest.”

“I fly on Friday from Heathrow, London for a tour of the Antipodes.”

Word of the Day – Antipathy

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Antipathy (noun)

an-tip-ath-ee

A deep-seated feeling of aversion.

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘opposition of feeling, nature, or disposition’): from French antipathie, or via Latin from Greek antipatheia, from antipathēs ‘opposed in feeling’, from anti ‘against’ + pathos ‘feeling’.

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Word of the Day – Cleat

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Cleat (noun)

Kl-eet

A T-shaped piece of metal or wood on a boat or ship, to which ropes are attached.

Each of a number of projections on the sole of a shoe, designed to prevent the wearer losing their footing.

Middle English (in the sense ‘wedge’): of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch kloot ‘ball, sphere’ and German Kloss ‘clod, dumpling’, also to clot and clout.

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