Word of the Day – Dimorphic

By July 10, 2017Word of the Day

Dimorphic (adj)

dai-mor-fik

Occurring in or representing two distinct forms.

Mid 19th century: from Greek dimorphos (from di- ‘twice’ + morphē ‘form’) + -ic.

Example sentences

“In this sexually dimorphic species, only the males have wings”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

Read More

Leave a Reply