Word of the Day – Edentulous

By June 19, 2017Word of the Day

Edentulous (adj)

ee-den-tool-us

Lacking teeth.

Early 18th century: from Latin edentulus, from e- (variant of ex-) ‘out’ + dens, dent- ‘tooth’ + -ulous.

Example sentences

“He was edentulous, but all the other checks were fine.”

Word of the Day – Abreption

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Abreption (noun) (rare)

a-brep-shun

To snatch something away, an instance of complete separation and removal.

Mid 16th century. From post-classical Latin abreption-, abreptio action of snatching away (636 in Isidore; also in an undated inscription) from classical Latin abrept-, past participial stem of abripere + -iō.

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Word of the Day – Grandiloquent

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Grandiloquent (adj)

gran-di-lo-kwent

Pompous or extravagant in language, style, or manner, especially in a way that is intended to impress.

Late 16th century: from Latin grandiloquus, literally ‘grand-speaking’, from grandis ‘grand’ + loqui ‘speak’. The ending was altered in English by association with eloquent.

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