Word of the Day – Exhort

By January 7, 2017Word of the Day

Exhort (verb)

egz-or-t

Strongly encourage or urge (someone) to do something.

The French roots for the word exhort mean “thoroughly encourage,” so to exhort is to fill up with encouragement.

Example sentences

“He exhorts me not to take the problems of the world so seriously, and to have more faith.”

“Another passage was the one where Miss Brodie exhorts her girls to be sure to recognise their prime and to live it to the full.”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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