Word of the Day – Folderol

By February 15, 2017Word of the Day

Folderol (noun)

fold-u-rol

Trivial or nonsensical fuss: A showy but useless item.

Originally used as a meaningless refrain in popular songs Charles Dickens used the term in his Sketches By Boz: “Smuggins, after a considerable quantity of coughing by way of symphony, and a most facetious sniff or two, which afford general delight, sings a comic song, with a fal-de-ral — tol-de-ral.”

Example sentences

“No amount of folderol, flummery or flattery makes it easier to swallow.”

“That kind of folderol is enough to make any reasonable person cringe.”

Word of the Day – Antidisestablishmentarianism

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Antidisestablishmentarianism(noun)

an-tee-dis-est-ab-lis-ment-aer-ee-an-izm

Opposition to the disestablishment of the Church of England.

Antidisestablishmentarianism is very occasionally found in genuine use, but it is most often cited as an example of a very long word. Other similar curiosities are floccinaucinihilipilification and pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (the longest word in this dictionary).

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Word of the Day – Kickshaw

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Kickshaw (noun) (archaic)

kik-shor

A fancy but insubstantial cooked dish, especially one of foreign origin. Or, An elegant but insubstantial trinket.

Late 16th century: from French quelque chose ‘something’. The French spelling was common in the 17th century; the present form results from interpretation of quelque chose as plural.

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Word of the Day – Chimaera

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Chimaera (noun) (also Chimera)

kai-mee-ra

(in Greek mythology) a fire-breathing female monster with a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a serpent’s tail. (modern biology) An organism containing a mixture of genetically different tissues, formed by processes such as fusion of early embryos, grafting, or mutation.

Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek khimaira ‘she-goat or chimaera’.

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Veridical (adj)

ve-rid-ik-al

Truthful, honest, able to be verified, corresponding to facts.

What a great derivative from verify. I love this, I’m going to try and use it. It sounds really great when you say it too… veridical.

Example sentences

“He’s offering a service but I’m not sure if it’s veridical”

“Memories aren’t known to be particularly veridical.”

Word of the Day – Antidisestablishmentarianism

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Antidisestablishmentarianism(noun)

an-tee-dis-est-ab-lis-ment-aer-ee-an-izm

Opposition to the disestablishment of the Church of England.

Antidisestablishmentarianism is very occasionally found in genuine use, but it is most often cited as an example of a very long word. Other similar curiosities are floccinaucinihilipilification and pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (the longest word in this dictionary).

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Word of the Day

Word of the Day – Kickshaw

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Kickshaw (noun) (archaic)

kik-shor

A fancy but insubstantial cooked dish, especially one of foreign origin. Or, An elegant but insubstantial trinket.

Late 16th century: from French quelque chose ‘something’. The French spelling was common in the 17th century; the present form results from interpretation of quelque chose as plural.

Read More

Word of the Day – Chimaera

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Chimaera (noun) (also Chimera)

kai-mee-ra

(in Greek mythology) a fire-breathing female monster with a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a serpent’s tail. (modern biology) An organism containing a mixture of genetically different tissues, formed by processes such as fusion of early embryos, grafting, or mutation.

Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek khimaira ‘she-goat or chimaera’.

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