Word of the Day – Folderol

By February 15, 2017Word of the Day

Folderol (noun)

fold-u-rol

Trivial or nonsensical fuss: A showy but useless item.

Originally used as a meaningless refrain in popular songs Charles Dickens used the term in his Sketches By Boz: “Smuggins, after a considerable quantity of coughing by way of symphony, and a most facetious sniff or two, which afford general delight, sings a comic song, with a fal-de-ral — tol-de-ral.”

Example sentences

“No amount of folderol, flummery or flattery makes it easier to swallow.”

“That kind of folderol is enough to make any reasonable person cringe.”

Word of the Day – Abnormous

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Abnormous (adj) (rare)

ab-nor-mus

Originally meant irregular, misshapen, but has come to mean overly enormous. Mainly US American use.

Earliest use of this is 1747 by bookseller Edmund Curll, thought to be from classic Latin abnormis.

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Word of the Day – Hooligan

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Hooligan (noun)

hoo-li-gun

A violent young trouble maker, often the member of a gang.

Fascinating etymology, hooligan comes from the Irish surname Houlihan. In the 1890s and through to the turn of the century, Irishman Patrick Hoolihan and his family ran riot in London to such an extent that their name became synonymous with disruptive and thuggish behaviour.

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Veridical (adj)

ve-rid-ik-al

Truthful, honest, able to be verified, corresponding to facts.

What a great derivative from verify. I love this, I’m going to try and use it. It sounds really great when you say it too… veridical.

Example sentences

“He’s offering a service but I’m not sure if it’s veridical”

“Memories aren’t known to be particularly veridical.”

Word of the Day – Hooligan

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Hooligan (noun)

hoo-li-gun

A violent young trouble maker, often the member of a gang.

Fascinating etymology, hooligan comes from the Irish surname Houlihan. In the 1890s and through to the turn of the century, Irishman Patrick Hoolihan and his family ran riot in London to such an extent that their name became synonymous with disruptive and thuggish behaviour.

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