Word of the Day -Hamartia

By April 14, 2017Word of the Day

Hamartia (noun) (literary)

ham-ah-tee-a

The fatal flaw that leads to the downfall of a character.

Has its origins in late 18th century: Greek, ‘fault, failure, guilt’; the term was used in Aristotle’s Poetics with reference to ancient Greek tragedy.

Example sentences

“It took until the last chapter but the protagonist’s hamartia was revealed.”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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