Word of the Day – Hoick

By September 9, 2017Word of the Day

Hoick (verb) (BrEn)

hoy-k

Lift or pull abruptly or with effort.

Late 19th century: perhaps a variant of hike.

Example sentences

“She hoicked her bag up onto the desk and insisted on seeing the manager.”

“Just hoick up the anchor and let’s get going.”

Word of the Day – Cleat

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Cleat (noun)

Kl-eet

A T-shaped piece of metal or wood on a boat or ship, to which ropes are attached.

Each of a number of projections on the sole of a shoe, designed to prevent the wearer losing their footing.

Middle English (in the sense ‘wedge’): of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch kloot ‘ball, sphere’ and German Kloss ‘clod, dumpling’, also to clot and clout.

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Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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