Word of the Day – Ilk

By March 4, 2018Word of the Day

Ilk (noun)

ilk

A type of people or things similar to those already referred to.

Old English ilca ‘same’, of Germanic origin; related to alike.

In modern usage, ilk is used in phrases such as of his ilk and of that ilk to mean ‘type’ or ‘sort.’ This sense arose out of a misunderstanding of the earlier, Scottish use in the phrase of that ilk, where it means ‘of the same name or place.’ For this reason, some traditionalists regard the modern use as incorrect. It is, however, the only common current use and is now part of standard English

Example sentences

“You know, salesmen and people of that ilk.”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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