Word of the Day – Ilk

By Mar 4, 2018Word of the Day

Ilk (noun)

ilk

A type of people or things similar to those already referred to.

Old English ilca ‘same’, of Germanic origin; related to alike.

In modern usage, ilk is used in phrases such as of his ilk and of that ilk to mean ‘type’ or ‘sort.’ This sense arose out of a misunderstanding of the earlier, Scottish use in the phrase of that ilk, where it means ‘of the same name or place.’ For this reason, some traditionalists regard the modern use as incorrect. It is, however, the only common current use and is now part of standard English

Example sentences

“You know, salesmen and people of that ilk.”

Word of the Day – Compersion

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Compersion (noun)

kom-pur-shun

The feeling of joy one has experiencing another’s joy, such as in witnessing a toddler’s joy and feeling joy in response.

From French compérage, derived from French compère, from Old French comper, from Latin compater, compatrem (“godfather”).

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