Word of the Day – Imago

By November 8, 2017Word of the Day

Imago (noun)

im-ay-go

The idealised mental image of someone, often a parent, that affects our behaviour. Also, the final and fully developed stage of an insect, typically winged.

Late 18th century (in imago (sense 1)): modern Latin use of Latin imago ‘image’. imago (sense 2) dates from the early 20th century.

Example sentences

“When it’s fully formed into an imago, you’ll see the beautiful butterfly it is.”

“Sadly the child’s ego is being hugely effected by the parental imagos.”

Word of the Day – Rampallion

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Rampallion (noun) (rare) (archaic)

ram-pal-ee-un

A ruffian, a villain, a rascal.

Late 16th century; earliest use found in Thomas Nashe (d. c1601), writer. Origin uncertain. Perhaps from ramp + -allion, perhaps showing alteration of rascallion by association with ramp. Perhaps compare later ramscallion, rapscallion, tatterdemalion.

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Word of the Day – Paraph

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Paraph (noun)

pa-raf

A flourish at the end of a signature, usually as a precaution against forgery.

Late Middle English (denoting a paragraph): from French paraphe, from medieval Latin paraphus (contraction of paragraphus ‘short horizontal stroke’).

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