Word of the Day – Louche

By January 11, 2017Word of the Day

Louche (adj)

loo-sh

Disreputable or sordid in a rakish or appealing way.

Originating from early 19th century French, louche literally translates to squinting.

Example sentences

“Fresh of face and louche of manner, they are equal parts Dickensian urchins and Wildean dandies.”

“Louche he may be but I am able to resist his charms and see him for what he is.”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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