Word of the Day – Louche

By January 11, 2017Word of the Day

Louche (adj)

loo-sh

Disreputable or sordid in a rakish or appealing way.

Originating from early 19th century French, louche literally translates to squinting.

Example sentences

“Fresh of face and louche of manner, they are equal parts Dickensian urchins and Wildean dandies.”

“Louche he may be but I am able to resist his charms and see him for what he is.”

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Word of the Day – Fandangle

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Fandangle (noun)

fan-dan-gul

A useless or purely ornamental thing: Nonsense.

Believed to have been derived from the Spanish dance Fandango which was adapted by the English to mean foolish in the early 19th century, perhaps by the Puritans of the time.

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Word of the Day – Clout

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Clout (noun)

kl-ao-wt

A heavy blow with the hand or a hard object: Influence or power, especially in politics or business.

(archaic) A piece of cloth or article of clothing which is the clout mentioned in the proverb; “ne’er cast a clout till May be out” with May more likely to mean the blossom of the Hawthorn than the month.

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Word of the Day – Filch

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Filch (verb)

fil-tch

Pilfer or steal (something, especially an item of small value) in a casual way.

Middle English filchen to attack (in a body), take as booty, Old English fylcian to marshal (troops), draw (soldiers) up in battle array, derivative of gefylce band of men; akin to folk.

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