Word of the Day – Lucifugous

By November 13, 2017Word of the Day

Lucifugous (adj)

loo-sif-ug-us

Shunning the light (of a creature).

Mid 17th century: from Latin lucifugus (from lux, luc- ‘light’ + fugere ‘to fly’) + -ous.

Example sentences

“We don’t see him during the day time, but he’s in his garden at night. It’s as though he’s lucifugous.”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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