Word of the Day – Moiety

By June 14, 2017Word of the Day

Moiety (noun)

moy-et-ee

Each of two parts into which a thing is or can be divided.

Late Middle English: from Old French moite, from Latin medietas ‘middle’, from medius ‘mid, middle’.

Example sentences

“the tax was to be delivered in two moieties”

“Memories aren’t known to be particularly veridical.”

Word of the Day – Rampallion

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Rampallion (noun) (rare) (archaic)

ram-pal-ee-un

A ruffian, a villain, a rascal.

Late 16th century; earliest use found in Thomas Nashe (d. c1601), writer. Origin uncertain. Perhaps from ramp + -allion, perhaps showing alteration of rascallion by association with ramp. Perhaps compare later ramscallion, rapscallion, tatterdemalion.

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Word of the Day – Paraph

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Paraph (noun)

pa-raf

A flourish at the end of a signature, usually as a precaution against forgery.

Late Middle English (denoting a paragraph): from French paraphe, from medieval Latin paraphus (contraction of paragraphus ‘short horizontal stroke’).

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