Word of the Day – Moiety

By June 14, 2017Word of the Day

Moiety (noun)

moy-et-ee

Each of two parts into which a thing is or can be divided.

Late Middle English: from Old French moite, from Latin medietas ‘middle’, from medius ‘mid, middle’.

Example sentences

“the tax was to be delivered in two moieties”

“Memories aren’t known to be particularly veridical.”

Word of the Day – Antipathy

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Antipathy (noun)

an-tip-ath-ee

A deep-seated feeling of aversion.

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘opposition of feeling, nature, or disposition’): from French antipathie, or via Latin from Greek antipatheia, from antipathēs ‘opposed in feeling’, from anti ‘against’ + pathos ‘feeling’.

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Word of the Day – Cleat

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Cleat (noun)

Kl-eet

A T-shaped piece of metal or wood on a boat or ship, to which ropes are attached.

Each of a number of projections on the sole of a shoe, designed to prevent the wearer losing their footing.

Middle English (in the sense ‘wedge’): of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch kloot ‘ball, sphere’ and German Kloss ‘clod, dumpling’, also to clot and clout.

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