Word of the Day – Perpendicular

By March 14, 2018Word of the Day

Perpendicular (adj)

pur-pen-dik-oo-lar

At an angle of 90° to a given line, plane, or surface or to the ground.

Late Middle English (as an adverb meaning ‘at right angles’): via Old French from Latin perpendicularis, from perpendiculum ‘plumb line’, from per- ‘through’ + pendere ‘to hang’.

Example sentences

“The lamp post sat perpendicular to the street.”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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