Word of the Day – Plap

By August 22, 2017Word of the Day

Plap (verb)

pl-ap

To come down or fall with the sound of a flat impact; to make a light slapping sound.

Mid 19th century; earliest use found in William Thackeray (1811–1863), novelist. Imitative. Compare plash, plash, flap, slap.

Example sentences

“He came down with a plap, jumped to his feet and carried on running.”

Word of the Day – Antipathy

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Antipathy (noun)

an-tip-ath-ee

A deep-seated feeling of aversion.

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘opposition of feeling, nature, or disposition’): from French antipathie, or via Latin from Greek antipatheia, from antipathēs ‘opposed in feeling’, from anti ‘against’ + pathos ‘feeling’.

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Word of the Day – Cleat

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Cleat (noun)

Kl-eet

A T-shaped piece of metal or wood on a boat or ship, to which ropes are attached.

Each of a number of projections on the sole of a shoe, designed to prevent the wearer losing their footing.

Middle English (in the sense ‘wedge’): of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch kloot ‘ball, sphere’ and German Kloss ‘clod, dumpling’, also to clot and clout.

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