Word of the Day – Pleb

By January 9, 2017Word of the Day

Pleb (noun)

pleb

(Derogatory) An ordinary person, especially one from the lower social classes.

Mid 17th century: originally as plural plebs, from Latin plebs the common people. Later a shortened form of plebeian.

Example sentences

“Due to the mix up we plebs got to mingle with the hoity-toity in the VIP area.”

“He considers everyone outside his social circle to be plebs and incapable of rational thought.”

Word of the Day – Nomenclature

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Nomenclature (noun)

no-men-kla-chuh

The devising or choosing of names for things, especially in a science or other discipline. / The term or terms applied to someone or something.

Early 17th century: from French, from Latin nomenclatura, from nomen ‘name’ + clatura ‘calling, summoning’ (from calare ‘to call’).

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Word of the Day – Decalcomania

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Decalcomania (noun)

dee-kalk-o-may-nee-a

The process of transferring designs from prepared paper on to glass or porcelain.

Mid 19th century: from French décalcomanie, from décalquer ‘transfer a tracing’ + -manie ‘-mania’ (with reference to the enthusiasm for the process in the 1860s).

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