Word of the Day – Pleb

By January 9, 2017Word of the Day

Pleb (noun)

pleb

(Derogatory) An ordinary person, especially one from the lower social classes.

Mid 17th century: originally as plural plebs, from Latin plebs the common people. Later a shortened form of plebeian.

Example sentences

“Due to the mix up we plebs got to mingle with the hoity-toity in the VIP area.”

“He considers everyone outside his social circle to be plebs and incapable of rational thought.”

Word of the Day – Sumptuary

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Sumptuary (adj) (historical)

sump-too-ur-ee

Relating to or denoting laws that limit private expenditure on food and personal items.

Early 17th century: from Latin sumptuarius, from sumptus ‘cost, expenditure’, from sumere ‘take’.

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Word of the Day – Symposium

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Symposium (noun)

sim-poe-zee-um

A conference or meeting to discuss a particular subject./ A collection of essays or papers on a particular subject by a number of contributors.

Late 16th century (denoting a drinking party): via Latin from Greek sumposion, from sumpotēs ‘fellow drinker’, from sun- ‘together’ + potēs ‘drinker’.

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