Word of the Day – Recidivism

By March 8, 2018 Word of the Day

Recidivism (noun)

ri-sid-iv-izm

The tendency of a convicted criminal to reoffend.

1863, from French récidiviste, from récidiver “to fall back, relapse,” from Medieval Latin recidivare “to relapse into sin,” from Latin recidivus “falling back,” from recidere “fall back,” from re- “back, again” (see re-) + comb.

 

Example sentences

“The new court system has been successful in reducing recidivism.”

Word of the Day – Cogitate

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Cogitate (adj)

koj-i-tayt

Think deeply about something; meditate or reflect.

Late 16th century: from Latin cogitat- ‘considered’, from the verb cogitare, from co- ‘together’ + agitare ‘turn over, consider’.

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Word of the Day – Careen

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Careen (verb)

ka-reen

(of a ship) tilt; lean over.
Move swiftly and in an uncontrolled way.

Late 16th century (as a noun denoting the position of a careened ship): from French carène, from Italian carena, from Latin carina ‘a keel’. Sense 2 was influenced by the verb career.

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Word of the Day – Lacet

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Lacet (noun)

la-set

A flat braided tape; especially a braid used to form designs on lace. Also: braided work, especially on lace. Frequently attributive, as “lacet braid”, “lacet work”, etc.

A hairpin bend in a road.

Early 19th century; earliest use found in Ladies’ Monthly Museum. From French lacet flat braided tape, braid used to form designs on lace from lace + -et
mid 19th century. From French lacet hairpin bend, specific sense development of lacet lace.

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