Word of the Day – Sententious

By September 5, 2017Word of the Day

Sententious (adj)

sen-ten-shus

Given to moralising in a pompous or affected manner.

Late Middle English: from Latin sententiosus, from sententia ‘opinion’ (see sentence). The original sense was ‘full of meaning or wisdom’, later becoming depreciatory.

Example sentences

“He’s a sententious old man and I’m not listening any more!”

Word of the Day – Defunct

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Defunct (adj)

dee-fun-kt

No longer existing or functioning.

Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘deceased’): from Latin defunctus ‘dead’, past participle of defungi ‘carry out, finish’, from de- (expressing reversal) + fungi ‘perform’.

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Word of the Day – Ordinally

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Ordinally (adverb)

aw-din-al-ee

With regard to, or at the level of, orders in a taxonomic system; according to an ordinal number, system, etc.; on an ordinal scale; with regard to order.

Mid 19th century; earliest use found in The Edinburgh Review. From ordinal + -ly.

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