Word of the Day – Sot

By November 30, 2017Word of the Day

Sot (noun)

sot

A habitual drunkard.

Late Old English sott ‘foolish person’, from medieval Latin sottus, reinforced by Old French sot ‘foolish’. The current sense of the noun dates from the late 16th century.

Example sentences

“She’s nothing but a gin-soaked old sot.”

Word of the Day – Premonish

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Premonish (verb) (rare)

pree-mon-ish

Inform (someone) of a possible future danger or problem; forewarn.

Mid 16th century: from Latin praemonere ‘forewarn’ with the ending altered after the pattern of admonish.

Read More

Word of the Day – Connive

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Connive (verb)

kon-aiv

Secretly allow (something immoral, illegal, or harmful) to occur.

Conspire to do something immoral, illegal, or harmful.

Early 17th century: from French conniver or Latin connivere ‘shut the eyes (to)’, from con- ‘together’ + an unrecorded word related to nictare ‘to wink’.

Read More

Leave a Reply