Word of the Day – Sot

By November 30, 2017Word of the Day

Sot (noun)

sot

A habitual drunkard.

Late Old English sott ‘foolish person’, from medieval Latin sottus, reinforced by Old French sot ‘foolish’. The current sense of the noun dates from the late 16th century.

Example sentences

“She’s nothing but a gin-soaked old sot.”

Word of the Day – Procellous

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Procellous (adj) (rare)

pro-sell-us

Stormy, turbulent.

Early 17th century; earliest use found in Thomas Goffe (?1591–1629), playwright and Church of England clergyman. From French † procelleux from classical Latin procellōsus stormy from procella + -ōsus.

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Word of the Day – Antinomy

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Antinomy (noun)

an-tin-o-mee

A contradiction between two beliefs or conclusions that are in themselves reasonable; a paradox.

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘a conflict between two laws’): from Latin antinomia, from Greek, from anti ‘against’ + nomos ‘law’.

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