Word of the Day – Sough

By January 10, 2017Word of the Day

Sough (verb)

suff or sa-ow

(of the wind in trees, the sea, etc.) make a moaning, whistling, or rushing sound.

A word that probably warrants two separate entries as it can be pronounced in two totally different ways and can also be used as a noun [in singular] A moaning, whistling, or rushing sound as made by the wind in the trees or the sea.

Example sentences

“The wind soughed in the grass and there was the hiss of the tumbling river.”

“A sough escapes her lips as her body lands on the ground.”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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