Word of the Day – Suffragette

By February 6, 2018Word of the Day

Suffragette (noun) (historical)

suff-ra-jet

A woman seeking the right to vote through organized protest.

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘intercessory prayers’, also ‘assistance’): from Latin suffragium, reinforced by French suffrage. The modern sense of ‘right to vote’ was originally US (dating from the late 18th century).

Example sentences

“Today is one hundred years since suffragettes secured votes for women.”

Word of the Day – Shibboleth

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Shibboleth (noun)

shib-oh-leth

A custom, principle, or belief distinguishing a particular class or group of people, especially a long-standing one regarded as outmoded or no longer important.

Mid 17th century: from Hebrew šibbōleṯ ‘ear of corn’, used as a test of nationality by its difficult pronunciation (Judg. 12:6).

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Word of the Day – Symposium

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Symposium (noun)

sim-poe-zee-um

A conference or meeting to discuss a particular subject./ A collection of essays or papers on a particular subject by a number of contributors.

Late 16th century (denoting a drinking party): via Latin from Greek sumposion, from sumpotēs ‘fellow drinker’, from sun- ‘together’ + potēs ‘drinker’.

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