Word of the Day – Symposium

By February 19, 2018Word of the Day

Symposium (noun)

sim-poe-zee-um

A conference or meeting to discuss a particular subject./ A collection of essays or papers on a particular subject by a number of contributors.

Late 16th century (denoting a drinking party): via Latin from Greek sumposion, from sumpotēs ‘fellow drinker’, from sun- ‘together’ + potēs ‘drinker’.

Example sentences

“We usually leave the symposium to discuss the ideas, then make a decision from there.”

“Memories aren’t known to be particularly veridical.”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

Read More

Leave a Reply