Word of the Day – Termagant

By November 10, 2016Word of the Day

Termagant (noun)

turm-u-gant

A harsh-tempered or overbearing woman.

I love the etymology of this word: Taken to be from Latin tri- three + vagant- wandering, and to refer to the moon ‘wandering’ between heaven, earth, and hell under the three names Selene, Artemis, and Persephone..

Example sentences

“Order was restored after the removal of the the shrieking termagant from the court.”

“He would do anything to avoid her termagant mother.”

Word of the Day – Machree

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Machree (noun) (Irish/Scots)

ma’k-ree

As a form of address: my dear. Now chiefly in “Mother Machree”, expressing (usually ironically) a stereotyped conception of Celtic or Irish identity.

Late 17th century; earliest use found in Irish Hudibras. From Irish mo chroí (Scottish Gaelic mo chridhe) my heart, my beloved from mo my + croí (Scottish Gaelic cridhe) heart from Early Irish cride heart, cognate with heart [interjection, adverb].

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Word of the Day – Lixiviate

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Lixiviate (verb) (chemistry) (archaic)

lik-siv-ee-ayt

Separate (a substance) into soluble and insoluble constituents by the percolation of liquid.

Mid 17th century: from modern Latin lixiviat- ‘impregnated with lye’, from the verb lixiviare, from lixivius ‘made into lye’, from lix ‘lye’.

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