Word of the Day – Ululate

By November 10, 2017Word of the Day

Ululate (verb)

u-loo-lay-t/ yu-loo-lay-t

Howl or wail as an expression of strong emotion, typically grief.

Early 17th century: from Latin ululat- ‘howled, shrieked’, from the verb ululare, of imitative origin. Both listed pronunciations are accepted.

Example sentences

“The crowd ululates as the body is laid out.”

Word of the Day – Resipiscence

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Resipiscence (noun)

resi-pisns

Originally: repentance for misconduct; recognition of one’s past misdeeds or errors. Later also: the action or fact of coming to one’s senses, or of returning to a more acceptable opinion.

Late 16th century; earliest use found in Thomas Norton (d. 1584), lawyer and writer. From Middle French resipiscence (French résipiscence) action or fact of coming to one’s senses or of returning to a more acceptable opinion, repentance for misconduct or its etymon post-classical Latin resipiscentia repentance from classical Latin resipīscent-, resipīscēns, present participle of resipīscere to regain consciousness, to become sane again, to recover one’s reason, to come to one’s senses again, to see reason + -ia; compare -ence. Compare Spanish resipiscencia, Italian resipiscenza.

Read More

Word of the Day – Macaronic

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Macaronic (adj)

mak-a-ron-ik

Denoting language, especially burlesque verse, containing words or inflections from one language introduced into the context of another.

Early 17th century (in the sense ‘characteristic of a jumble or medley’): from modern Latin macaronicus, from obsolete Italian macaronico, a humorous formation from macaroni (see macaroni).

Read More

Leave a Reply