Word of the Day – Ague

By February 26, 2020Word of the Day

Ague (noun) (archaic)

ay-goo

Malaria or another illness involving fever and shivering.

Middle English via Old French from medieval Latin acuta (febris) ‘acute (fever)’.

Example sentences

“Although he diagnosed ague, we cannot confirm malaria.”

Word of the Day – Oneirologist

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Oneirologist (noun) an-eer-ol-oj-ist A person who studies dreams and their interpretation. Mid 19th century; earliest use found in Robert Southey (1774–1843), poet and reviewer. (more…)

Word of the Day – Charango

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Charango (noun) cha-ran-go A small Andean guitar, traditionally made from an armadillo shell. 1920s from South American Spanish. (more…)

Word of the Day – Progressivism

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Progressivism (noun) pro-res-iv-izm Support for or advocacy of social reform. (more…)

Word of the Day – Pokal

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Pokal (noun) po-kal Originally: a large German goblet or tankard, usually made of glass, and often having a lid (now chiefly historical). Now also: a large or stylized cup or…

Word of the Day – Riotous

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Riotous (adj) ry-ut-us Marked by or involving public disorder or rowdy behaviour. Middle English (in the sense ‘troublesome’): from Old French, from riote (more…)

Word of the Day – Freakazoid

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Freakazoid (noun) (slang) free-ka-zoyd Someone who is freakish or weird. 1980s. Irregularly from freak + -oid, with insertion of -az- perhaps after schizoid, sleazoid. (more…)

Word of the Day – Kilderkin

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Kilderkin (noun) kil-de-kin A cask for liquids or other substances, holding 16 or 18 gallons. Late Middle English from Middle Dutch kinderkin, variant of kinerkijn, diminutive of kintal (see quintal).…

Word of the Day – Ziti

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Ziti (noun) zee-tee Large pasta tubes resembling macaroni From Italian (more…)

Word of the Day – Exuviate

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Exuviate (verb) eks-oo-vee-ayt Shed (a skin or shell). Mid 19th century from exuviae+ -ate. (more…)

Leave your vote

Leave a Reply

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.