Word of the Day – Megrim

By December 8, 2018 Word of the Day

Megrim (noun)

mee-grim

(archaic) Depression, low spirits.

A whim or fancy.

Late Middle English, variant of migraine

Example sentences

“He had the megrims and there was no cheering him up.”

“He had to move cities and relocate on the megrim of his employers.”

Word of the Day – Malefit

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Malefit (noun) mal-i-fit A misfortune, a disadvantage. Mid 18th century. From mal- + -efit. (more…)

Word of the Day – Turnpike

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Turnpike (noun) turn-pi-k A toll gate. (more…)

Word of the Day – Duodecimo

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Duodecimo (noun) doo-o-des-im-o A size of book in which each leaf is one twelfth of the size of the printing sheet. Mid 17th century: from Latin ( in) duodecimo ‘in…

Word of the Day – Evanesce

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Evanesce (verb) (literary) ee-van-ess Pass out of sight, memory, or existence. Mid 19th century: from Latin evanescere, from e- (variant of ex-) ‘out of’ + vanus ‘empty’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Swive

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Swive (verb) (archaic) (humorous) swai-v Have sexual intercourse with. Middle English: apparently from the Old English verb swīfan ‘move (along a course), sweep’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Progeny

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Progeny (noun) proj-en-ee A descendant or the descendants of a person, animal, or plant; offspring. Middle English: from Old French progenie, from Latin progenies, from progignere ‘beget’ (see progenitor). (more…)

Word of the Day – Harridan

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Harridan (noun) ha-rid-an A strict, bossy, or belligerent old woman. Late 17th century (originally slang): perhaps from French haridelle ‘old horse’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Somnambulant

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Somnambulant (adj) som-nam-boo-lant Resembling or characteristic of a sleepwalker; sluggish. (more…)

Word of the Day – Comestible

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Comestible (noun) (archaic) (humorous) kom-est-ibl An item of food Late 15th century: from Old French, from medieval Latin comestibilis, from Latin comest- ‘eaten up’, from the verb comedere, from com-…

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