Word of the Day – Sclerotic

By June 15, 2019 Word of the Day

Sclerotic (adj)

sk-leer-ot-ik

(medicine) Of or having sclerosis.

Becoming rigid and unresponsive; losing the ability to adapt.

Example sentences

“The X-ray showed the sclerotic areas.”

“The problem is successive sclerotic governments have kept things stagnant.”

Word of the Day – Feckless

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Feckless (adj) fek-les Lacking initiative or strength of character; irresponsible. Late 16th century from Scots and northern English dialect feck (from effeck, variant of effect)+ -less. (more…)

Word of the Day – Ryu

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Ryu (noun) ree-oo A Japanese school or style of art. From Japanese (more…)

Word of the Day – Merle

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Merle (noun) (Scots) (archaic) mu-rl A blackbird Late Middle English via Old French from Latin merula. (more…)

Word of the Day – Prosopopoeia

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Prosopopoeia (noun) pros-op-up-ee-a A figure of speech in which an abstract thing is personified. Mid 16th century via Latin from Greek prosōpopoiia, from prosōpon ‘person’ + poiein ‘to make’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Consternation

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Consternation (noun) kon-stur-nay-shun A feeling of anxiety or dismay, typically at something unexpected. Early 17th century from Latin consternatio(n-), from the verb consternare ‘lay prostrate, terrify’ (more…)

Word of the Day – Hegemony

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Hegemony (noun) hej-em-o-nee Leadership or dominance, especially by one state or social group over others. Mid 16th century from Greek hēgemonia, from hēgemōn ‘leader’, from hēgeisthai ‘to lead’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Entropy

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Entropy (noun) en-trop-ee Lack of order or predictability; gradual decline into disorder. Mid 19th century from en-‘inside’ + Greek tropē ‘transformation’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Madrigal

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Madrigal (noun) mad-rig-ul A part-song for several voices, especially one of the Renaissance period, typically unaccompanied and arranged in elaborate counterpoint. From Italian madrigale (from medieval Latin carmen matricale ‘simple…

Word of the Day – Scapula

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Scapula (noun) skap-yu-la The technical name for a shoulder blade Late 16th century from late Latin, singular of Latin scapulae ‘shoulder blades’. (more…)

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