Word of the Day – Thicket

By September 17, 2019 Word of the Day

Thicket (noun)

thik-it

A dense group of bushes or trees.

Old English thiccet (see thick)

Example sentences

“We could hear the owl, but we couldn’t see it in the dense thicket.”

Word of the Day – Pep

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